Ottley's Bibliography of British Railway History

Author: National Railway Museum

Publisher: Virago Press

ISBN: 1872826105

Category: Railroads

Page: 647

View: 499

For over thirty years the Bibliography of British Railway History has been an essential tool for anyone wanting to study the history of rail transport and one of the foundations for the best of recent railway historical research. The continuing output of new publications about railways is such that a substantial supplement is required from time to time to maintain the work's utility. This is the second such supplement. As well as providing addenda to some of the 13,000 entries in the previous volumes, this volume has 6600 new entries.
Tracing Your Railway Ancestors

Author: Di Drummond

Publisher: Casemate Publishers

ISBN: 9781844686704

Category: Reference

Page: 276

View: 419

Di Drummond's concise and informative guide to Britain's railways will be absorbing reading for anyone who wants to learn about the history of the industry and for family history researchers who want to find out about the careers of their railway ancestors. In a clear and accessible way she guides readers through the social, technical and economic aspects of the story. She describes in vivid detail the rapid growth, maturity and long decline of the railways from the earliest days in the late-eighteenth century to privatization in the 1990s. In the process she covers the themes and issues that family historians, local historians and railway enthusiasts will need to understand in order to pursue their research. A sequence of short, fact-filled chapters gives an all-round view of the development of the railwaysIn addition to tracing the birth and growth of the original railway companies, she portrays the types of work that railwaymen did and pays particular attention to the railway world in which they spent their working lives. The tasks they undertook, the special skills they had to learn, the conditions they worked in, the organization and hierarchy of the railway companies, and the make-up of railway unions - all these elements in the history of the railways are covered. She also introduces the reader to the variety of records that are available for genealogical research - staff records and registers, publications, census returns, biographies and autobiographies, and the rest of the extensive literature devoted to the railway industry.
Routledge Revivals: The Atlas of British Railway History (1985)

Author: Michael Freeman

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351343022

Category: Transportation

Page: 132

View: 403

First published in 1985, this Atlas uses over 50 specially drawn maps to trace the rise and fall of the railways’ fortunes, and is supported by an interesting and authoritative text. Financial and operating statistics are clearly presented in diagrammatic form and provide a wealth of information rarely available to the student of railway history. Freeman and Aldcroft provide the basis for a new understanding of the way in which the railways transformed Britain by the scale of their engineering works, by shrinking national space and reorganising the layouts of urban areas. Maps show the evolution of early wagon routes into the first railway routes, the frenetic activity of the ‘Railway Mania’ years, and the consolidation of these lines into a national network. This exciting presentation of railway development will interest the enthusiast as well as the more general student of British transport history.
Railways and Culture in Britain

Author: Ian Carter

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 0719059666

Category: History

Page: 362

View: 800

The 19th-century steam railway epitomized modernity's relentlessly onrushing advance. Ian Carter delves into the cultural impact of the train. Why, for example, did Britain possess no great railway novel? He compares fiction and images by canonical British figures (Turner, Dickens, Arnold Bennett) with selected French and Russian competitors: Tolstoy, Zola, Monet, Manet. He argues that while high cultural work on the British steam railway is thin, British popular culture did not ignore it. Detailed discussions of comic fiction, crime fiction, and cartoons reveal a popular fascination with railways tumbling from vast (and hitherto unexplored) stores of critically overlooked genres.
Fire and Steam

Author: Christian Wolmar

Publisher: Atlantic Books Ltd

ISBN: 9781848872615

Category: History

Page: 300

View: 436

The opening of the pioneering Liverpool and Manchester Railway in 1830 marked the beginning of the railways' vital role in changing the face of Britain. Fire and Steam celebrates the vision and determination of the ambitious Victorian pioneers who developed this revolutionary transport system and the navvies who cut through the land to enable a country-wide network to emerge. From the early days of steam to electrification, via the railways' magnificent contribution in two world wars, the chequered history of British Rail, and the buoyant future of the train, Fire and Steam examines the social and economical importance of the railway and how it helped to form the Britain of today.
Conserving the Railway Heritage

Author: Peter Burman

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781136745003

Category: Architecture

Page: 244

View: 771

Great Britain not only invented the main-line railway but has also led the way in it's preservation - not just locomotves and carriages but also the buildings and structures that bear witness to the confidence of railway developers, architects and engineers. This book defines the nature of the railway heritage - from signalboxes, viaducts, tunnels and locomotive depots - and then discusses priorities and the best practice for it's conservation. The subject is a strongly topical one due to current concern over privatization, the effects of planned high-speed rail links and lively debates concerning the role of the enthusiast in railway preservation.
Encyclopedia of Ephemera

Author: Michael Twyman

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136787799

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 524

The joy of finding an old box in the attic filled with postcards, invitations, theater programs, laundry lists, and pay stubs is discovering the stories hidden within them. The paper trails of our lives -- or ephemera -- may hold sentimental value, reminding us of great grandparents. They chronicle social history. They can be valuable as collectibles or antiques. But the greatest pleasure is that these ordinary documents can reconstruct with uncanny immediacy the drama of day-to-day life. The Encyclopedia of Ephemera is the first work of its kind, providing an unparalleled sourcebook with over 400 entries that cover all aspects of everyday documents and artifacts, from bookmarks to birth certificates to lighthouse dues papers. Continuing a tradition that started in the Victorian era, when disposable paper items such as trade cards, die-cuts and greeting cards were accumulated to paste into scrap books, expert Maurice Rickards has compiled an enormous range of paper collectibles from the obscure to the commonplace. His artifacts come from around the world and include such throw-away items as cigarette packs and crate labels as well as the ubiquitous faxes, parking tickets, and phone cards of daily life. As this major new reference shows, simple slips of paper can speak volumes about status, taste, customs, and taboos, revealing the very roots of popular culture.
British Railway Enthusiasm

Author: Ian Carter

Publisher:

ISBN: STANFORD:36105131610490

Category: History

Page: 316

View: 120

This is the first academic book to study railway enthusiasts in Britain. Far from a trivial topic, the postwar train-spotting craze swept most boys and some girls into a passion for railways. For many in this cohort, train spotting ignited a lifetime's interest. British Railway Enthusiasm traces this postwar cohort and those who followed, as they moved through the life cycle. As the years turned these people invigorated different sectors in the world of railway enthusiasm--train spotting, railway modeling, collecting railway relics--and then, in response to widespread grief at main line steam traction's death, Britain's now-huge preserved railway industry. Today this industry finds itself riven by tensions between preserving a loved past which ever fewer people can remember and earning money from tourist visitors.