British Industrial Steam Locomotives

Author: David Mather

Publisher: Pen and Sword Transport

ISBN: 9781526770202

Category: Transportation

Page: 208

View: 306

The first steam locomotives used on any British railway, worked in industry. The use of new and second hand former main line locomotives, was once a widespread aspect of the railways of Britain. This volume covers many of the once numerous manufacturers who constructed steam locomotives for industry and contractors from the 19th to the mid 20th centuries. David Mather has spent many years researching and collecting photographs across Britain, of most of the different locomotive types that once worked in industry. This book is designed to be both a record of these various manufacturers and a useful guide to those researching and modelling industrial steam.
British Industrial Steam Locomotives

Author: David Mather

Publisher: Pen and Sword Transport

ISBN: 9781526770189

Category: Transportation

Page: 208

View: 225

A pictorial history of the many producers of industrial steam locomotives in Great Britain, from the early nineteenth century to the mid-twentieth century. The first steam locomotives used on any British railway worked in industry. The use of new and second hand former main line locomotives was once a widespread aspect of the railways of Britain. This volume covers many of the once numerous manufacturers who constructed steam locomotives for industry and contractors from the nineteenth to the mid-twentieth centuries. David Mather has spent many years researching and collecting photographs across Britain, of most of the different locomotive types that once worked in industry. This book is designed to be both a record of these various manufacturers and a useful guide to those researching and modelling industrial steam. Praise for British Industrial Steam Locomotives “A good introduction, hopefully it will encourage some of those who have only been involved during the preservation period to take a wider interest in the historical aspects of the subject.” —Industrial Locomotive Society
Steam, Soot and Rust

Author: Colin Garratt

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 9781473844124

Category: Transportation

Page: 160

View: 243

The disappearance of the steam locomotive in the land of its birth touched the hearts of millions, but when the government announced the Modernisation Plan for Britain's railways in 1955, under which steam was to be phased out in favour of diesel and electric traction, few people took it seriously. Steam locomotives were an integral part of our daily lives and had been for almost one and a half centuries. Furthermore, they were still being built in large numbers. It was popularly believed that they would see the century out and probably well beyond that. But the reality was that by 1968 Ð a mere thirteen years after the Modernisation Plan Ð steam traction had disappeared from Britain's main line railways. It was harrowing to witness the breaking up of engines, which were the icons of their day, capable of working long-distance inter-city expresses weighing 400 tons on schedules faster than a mile a minute. Top speeds of 100mph were not unknown. This book chronicles the last few years as scrap yards all over Britain went into overtime, cutting up thousands of locomotives and releasing a bounty of more than a million tons of scrap whilst the engines, which remained in service, were a shadow of their former selves; filthy, wheezing and clanking their way to an ignominious end. The pictures in this book are augmented by essays written by Colin Garratt at the time. Although steam disappeared from the main line network it survives in everÐdwindling numbers on industrial systems such as collieries, ironstone mines, power stations, shipyards, sugar factories, paper mills and docks. In such environments steam traction eked out a further decade and during this time many of the industrial locations closed rendering the locomotives redundant. The British steam locomotive was born amid the coalfields and was destined to die there one and three quarter centuries later.
Jordan's Guide to British Steam Locomotives

Author: Owen Jordan

Publisher: Spotlight Poets

ISBN: 1872438709

Category: Railroads

Page: 336

View: 751

Jordan's Guide to British Steam Locomotives re-tells a story which grows more amazing with each telling. From the railway's early origins as a crude horse-and-gravity means of getting coal tubs from the pit head to the canal basin, through the eventual mastery of technical problems by derring-do, industrial espionage and experiments (some more disastrous than others) the coming of commercial interests, and the almost inevitable resulting clash between what was best for the railways, and what was most profitable for the shareholders. The author then charts the drastic impact of the two world wars, the struggle to innovate through the balmy but becalmed days of the 1930s, and the inevitability of the advent of British Railways and with it the end of the steam age. significant parallels which will soon cause them to revise their conclusions. Squabbling companies, trade rivalries, and a speed restriction for the safety of the passengers could equally be the story of Victorian railways or Railtrack versus ATOC, post-Hatfield. And, while it is fashionable to believe that the present state of the railways, which everyone agrees is due to under-investment, dates back to Dr Beeching and the inertia of 1960s nationalisation, this re-telling of the tale demonstrates that the seeds of that decay were sown as long ago as 1914 in some cases, as the First World War precipitated a set of circumstances, forcing the changing of the points for ever on the tracks of railway history, leading to today's inevitable conclusion. Not so much a case of the wrong kind of snow, but the wrong set of decisions, the signals already set for the end of the line. larger than life, and some of their names form a familiar litany of railway poetry; Stephenson, Trevithick, Gresley, Stainier, Bulleid. Not to mention the names of their creations, the Atlantics, the Pacifics, the Britannias, the Royal Scots, the Castles and the Kings. have ever spent either a cold winter day or a warm summer afternoon with thermos flask and notebook on the end of the platform will find plenty of detail here to satisfy them, even if they already know every cog of a valve actuation gear and can cobble together an inside piston valve from spares found in a Barry Island scrapyard, while the interested general reader will find much to enthral them, in a story which sees intrigue, romance, stupidity and greed triumphing, while good ideas are shunted into the siding of history forever, a story which is crucially interwoven with the history of Britain at every critical juncture over the last two hundred years, and explains in no small way how the train system came to its present sorry impasse. but which still continues to grip our collective imagination, 178 years after those lumbering monsters first snorted their way up the track at Rainhill.
British Steam BR Standard Locomotives

Author: Keith Langston

Publisher: Casemate Publishers

ISBN: 9781845631468

Category: Transportation

Page: 208

View: 323

After WWII the existing railway companies were all put into the control of the newly formed British Transport Commission and that government organization spawned British Railways, which came into being on 1st January 1948. The railway infrastructure had suffered badly during the war years and most of the steam locomotives were 'tired' and badly maintained and or life expired. Although the management of British Railways was already planning to replace steam power with diesel and electric engines/units they still took a decision to build more steam locomotives (as a stop gap). Some 999 (yes just 1 short) Standard locomotives were built in 12 classes ranging from super powerful express and freight engine to suburban tank locomotives. The locomotives were mainly in good order when the order came in 1968 to end steam, some only 8 years old.There still exists a fleet of 46 preserved Standards of which 75% are in working order in and around the UKs preserved railways, furthermore 3 new build standard locomotives are proposed. Steam fans who were around in the 1960s all remember the 'Standards'.
British Steam: BR Standard Locomotives

Author: Fred Kerr

Publisher: Casemate Publishers

ISBN: 9781783408016

Category: Transportation

Page: 208

View: 469

After WWII the existing railway companies were all put into the control of the newly formed British Transport Commission and that government organization spawned British Railways, which came into being on 1st January 1948. The railway infrastructure had suffered badly during the war years and most of the steam locomotives were 'tired' and badly maintained and or life expired. Although the management of British Railways was already planning to replace steam power with diesel and electric engines/units they still took a decision to build more steam locomotives (as a stop gap). Some 999 (yes just 1 short) Standard locomotives were built in 12 classes ranging from super powerful express and freight engine to suburban tank locomotives. The locomotives were mainly in good order when the order came in 1968 to end steam, some only 8 years old.There still exists a fleet of 46 preserved Standards of which 75% are in working order in and around the UKs preserved railways, furthermore 3 new build standard locomotives are proposed. Steam fans who were around in the 1960s all remember the 'Standards'.
Scottish Steam

Author: Fred Kerr

Publisher: Wharncliffe

ISBN: 9781473838727

Category: Transportation

Page: 240

View: 406

Scotland is renowned worldwide for its engineering prowess, which of course included locomotive building. This lavishly illustrated and detailed publication celebrates standard gauge steam locomotive building North of the Border. Focussing not only on the achievements of the major companies, North British Locomotive Co Ltd, Neilson & Co Ltd, Neilson Reid & Co Ltd, William Bearmore Ltd, Sharp Stewart & Co Ltd,and Andrew Barclay, Sons & Co Ltd it also highlights the contribution made by several of the smaller, but nevertheless significant locomotive builders. Details of the output of the several railway company locomotive building works are also included. All of the Scottish built locomotive classes which came into British Railway's ownership are featured ,and a large majority of the carefully selected images are published for the first time. Scottish Steam celebrates the significant contribution made by Scottish railway engineering workshops to steam locomotive development.