British Railways in the 1960s: Western Region

Author: Geoff Plumb

Publisher: Pen and Sword Transport

ISBN: 9781473869837

Category: Transportation

Page: 178

View: 991

After the Second World War, Britain’s railways were rundown and worn out, requiring massive investment and modernisation. The ‘Big Four’ railway companies were nationalised from 1948 and the newly formed British Railways embarked on a programme of building new ‘Standard’ steam locomotives to replace older types. These started to come on stream from 1951. This programme was superseded by the 1955 scheme to dieselise and electrify many lines and so the last loco of the ‘Standard’ types was built in 1960 – and the steam locomotives had been swept entirely from the BR network by 1968. This series of books, ‘The Geoff Plumb Collection’, is a photographic account of those last few years of the steam locomotives, their decline and replacement during the transition years. Each book covers one of the former ‘Big Four’, in the form of the BR Regions they became: the Southern Railway, London Midland & Scottish Railway, Great Western Railway and London & North Eastern Railway, including some pictures of the Scottish lines of the LMS and LNER. The books are not intended to convey a complete history of the railways but to illustrate how things were, to a certain extent, in the relatively recent past and impart some information through comprehensive captions, which give a sense of occasion – often a ‘last run’ of a locomotive type or over a stretch of line about to be closed down. The photos cover large parts of the country, though it was impossible to get everywhere given the overall timetable of just a few years – mainly when the author was still a schoolboy with limited time and disposable income to get around. Pictures are of the highest quality that could be produced with the equipment then available, but they do reflect real life and real times. In simple terms, a look at a period not so long ago but now gone forever.
British Railways in the 1960s

Author: Geoff Plumb

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 9781473869790

Category: Transportation

Page: 160

View: 895

After the Second War, Britain's railways were rundown and worn out, requiring massive investment and modernization. The Big Four railway companies were nationalized from 1948, and the newly formed British Railways embarked on a program of building new Standard steam locomotives to replace older types. These started to come on stream from 1951. This program was superseded by the 1955 scheme to dieselize and electrify many lines and so the last loco of the Standard types was built in 1960 and the steam locomotives had been swept entirely from the BR network by 1968. This series of books, The Geoff Plumb Collection, is a photographic account of those last few years of the steam locomotives, their decline and replacement during the transition years. Each book covers one of the former Big Four, the Southern Railway, London Midland & Scottish Railway, Great Western Railway and London & North Eastern Railway, including some pictures of the Scottish lines of the LMS and LNER. The books are not intended to convey a complete history of the railways but to illustrate how things were, to a certain extent, in the relatively recent past and impart some information through comprehensive captions, which give a sense of occasion often a last run of a locomotive type or over a stretch of line about to be closed down. The photos cover large parts of the country, though it was impossible to get everywhere given the overall timetable of just a few years mainly when the author was still a schoolboy with limited time and disposable income to get around. Pictures are of the highest quality that could be produced with the equipment then available, but they do reflect real life and real times. In simple terms, a look at a period not so long ago but now gone forever.
British Railways in the 1960s: Western Region

Author: Geoff Plumb

Publisher: Pen and Sword Transport

ISBN: 1473823951

Category:

Page: 176

View: 809

After the Second World War, Britain's railways were rundown and worn out, requiring massive investment and modernisation. The 'Big Four' railway companies were nationalised from 1948 and the newly formed British Railways embarked on a programme of building new 'Standard' steam locomotives to replace older types. These started to come on stream from 1951. This programme was superseded by the 1955 scheme to dieselise and electrify many lines and so the last loco of the 'Standard' types was built in 1960 - and the steam locomotives had been swept entirely from the BR network by 1968. This series of books, 'The Geoff Plumb Collection', is a photographic account of those last few years of the steam locomotives, their decline and replacement during the transition years. Each book covers one of the former 'Big Four', in the form of the BR Regions they became: the Southern Railway, London Midland & Scottish Railway, Great Western Railway and London & North Eastern Railway, including some pictures of the Scottish lines of the LMS and LNER. The books are not intended to convey a complete history of the railways but to illustrate how things were, to a certain extent, in the relatively recent past and impart some information through comprehensive captions, which give a sense of occasion - often a 'last run' of a locomotive type or over a stretch of line about to be closed down. The photos cover large parts of the country, though it was impossible to get everywhere given the overall timetable of just a few years - mainly when the author was still a schoolboy with limited time and disposable income to get around. Pictures are of the highest quality that could be produced with the equipment then available, but they do reflect real life and real times. In simple terms, a look at a period not so long ago but now gone forever.
British Railways Steam in the 1960s

Author: E. H. Sawford

Publisher: Sutton Pub Limited

ISBN: IND:30000112595966

Category: History

Page: 166

View: 684

"In this book, the follow-up to his highly successful British Railways Steam in the 1950s, Eric Sawford traces the last days of steam on British Railways, showing a wide variety of engines and locations. A superb collection of over 250 photographs, complemented by informed commentary and captions, this is a book that the steam enthusiast will not want to miss."--BOOK JACKET.
British Railways in the 1950s and ’60s

Author: Greg Morse

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9780747812692

Category: Transportation

Page: 56

View: 507

As Britain moved from austerity to prosperity in the 1950s and 1960s, it became clear that British Railways needed to modernise its equipment and rationalise its network if it was to hold its own in the face of growing competition from road and air transport. After attempting to maintain pre-war networks and technology in the 1950s, a reversal of policy in the 1960s brought line closures, new liveries and the last breath of steam, as Dr Beeching and his successors strove to break even and build a new business from the old. From Britannia to the 'Blue Pullman', Evening Star to Inter-City, Greg Morse takes us through this turbulent twenty-year period, which started with drab prospects and ended with BR poised to launch the fastest diesel-powered train in the world.
Great British Railways

Author: Vicki Pipe

Publisher: September Publishing

ISBN: 9781912836291

Category: Travel

Page: 128

View: 469

Take a journey of discovery and explore the top 50 things to see and do on Great British railways. Find the rarest train routes, learn about the railways' people and animal friends, marvel at iconic stations, whizz over amazing bridges, steam through tremendous tunnels and visit the most spectacular railway sights. You can: Ride across dramatic viaducts. Visit Britain's busiest railway hub and its least-used station. Stop at Britain's highest station. Meet the railway cats and dogs. This lively, interactive book will inspire children – and adults – to seize the moment and explore the wonderful world of Great Britain's railways. Written by Vicki Pipe with additional fun facts from Geoff Marshall, the dynamic duo behind the YouTube channel's All the Stations and authors of The Railway Adventures.
British Railways in The 1960s

Author: Geoff M. PLUMB

Publisher: Pen and Sword Transport

ISBN: 1473823935

Category: Railroad trains

Page: 160

View: 488

After the Second War, Britain's railways were rundown and worn out, requiring massive investment and modernization. The Big Four railway companies were nationalized from 1948, and the newly formed British Railways embarked on a program of building new Standard steam locomotives to replace older types. These started to come on stream from 1951. This program was superseded by the 1955 scheme to dieselize and electrify many lines and so the last loco of the Standard types was built in 1960 and the steam locomotives had been swept entirely from the BR network by 1968. This series of books, 'The Geoff Plumb Collection', is a photographic account of those last few years of the steam locomotives, their decline and replacement during the transition years. Each book covers one of the former Big Four, the Southern Railway, London Midland & Scottish Railway, Great Western Railway and London & North Eastern Railway, including some pictures of the Scottish lines of the LMS and LNER. The books are not intended to convey a complete history of the railways but to illustrate how things were, to a certain extent, in the relatively recent past and impart some information through comprehensive captions, which give a sense of occasion often a last run of a locomotive type or over a stretch of line about to be closed down. The photos cover large parts of the country, though it was impossible to get everywhere given the overall timetable of just a few years mainly when the author was still a schoolboy with limited time and disposable income to get around. Pictures are of the highest quality that could be produced with the equipment then available, but they do reflect real life and real times. In simple terms, a look at a period not so long ago but now gone forever.
British Railways 1948-73

Author: T. R. Gourvish

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521264808

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 1690

View: 517

This is a business history of the first twenty-five years of nationalised railways in Britain. Commissioned by the British Railways Board and based on the Board's extensive archives, it breaks new ground in analysing fully the dynamics of nationalised industry management and, in particular, the complexities of the vital relationship with government. After exploring the origins of nationalisation, the book deals with the organisation, financial performance, investment and commercial policies of the British Transport Commission (1948-2), Railway Executive (1948-53) and British Railways Board (1963-73). The special problems of the railway industry, unique in its complexity, are fully explored, and new calculations of profit and loss, investment, and productivity are provided on a consistent basis for 1948-73. This business history thus represents a major contribution not only to the debate about the role of the railways in a modem economy but also to that concerning the nationalised industries, which have proved to be one of the most enduring problems of the British economy since the War.
The Reshaping of British Railways

Author: British Railway Board

Publisher: Collins

ISBN: 0007511965

Category: Railroads

Page: 176

View: 148

The Reshaping of British Railways is a piece of railway history every dedicated enthusiast will want in their collection. Bradshaw's Guide has given birth to a wave of nostalgia for our Victorian and Edwardian railway systems. The Reshaping of British Railways, another facsimile which will fascinate train buffs, is the document that decimated these systems forever. With the British Rail company's failure, by the early 1960s, to stem the network's huge annual losses, the government turned to Dr Richard Beeching. He was to save money by recommending the cutting of redundant routes and services. His two reports, The Reshaping of British Railways (1963) and The Development of the Major Railway Trunk Routes (1965), were published by the British Railways Board in 1965, and offer a fascinating snapshot of our nation's railways. In the first part of this historic facsimile, Dr Beeching identifies the 2,363 stations and 5,000 miles (8,000 km) of railway line for closure - over 50% of all stations and 30% of route miles. The second part recommends a small number of major remaining routes for significant investment. Well documented nationwide protests resulted in the saving of some stations and lines, but the majority were closed as planned and Beeching's name is to this day associated with the mass closure of railways and the loss of many local services in the period that followed. Now, for the first time, this iconic piece of railway history is available in its entirety, complete with the original tables and maps of routes deemed fit for closure.
British Rail

Author: Christian Wolmar

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 9780241456217

Category: Transportation

Page: 416

View: 857

Pre-order the authoritative and enthralling history of of the rise and fall of the state-owned British Rail. You think you know British Rail. From the sandwiches to the inefficiency to the violent yellow livery, we haven't looked kindly on this, the last of our great state-owned organizations to be privatized. But you don't know the whole story. From its creation after the Second World War, through its fifty-year lifetime, British Rail was an innovative powerhouse that transformed our transport system, uniting disparate lines into a highly competent organization - heralding 'The Age of the Train' and for a time providing one of the fastest regular rail services in the world. Born into post-war austerity, traumatized, impoverished and exploited by a hostile press, the state-owned railway was dismissed as a dinosaur unable to evolve, and swept away by a government hellbent on selling it off. Now, award-winning writer Christian Wolmar provides a new perspective on national loss in a time of privatization. British Rail is ripe for a new history. Praise for Christian Wolmar The greatest expert on British trains' - The Guardian 'Our most eminent transport journalist' - The Spectator 'If the world's railways have a laureate, it is surely Christian Wolmar' - Boston Globe 'Christian Wolmar is in love with the railways. He writes constantly and passionately about them. He is their wisest, most detailed historian and a constant prophet of their rebirth . . . if you love the hum of the wheels and of history, then Christian Wolmar is your man' - Observer
British Railways in the 1970s and ’80s

Author: Greg Morse

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9780747814108

Category: Transportation

Page: 64

View: 820

For British Rail, the 1970s was a time of contrasts, when bad jokes about sandwiches and pork pies often belied real achievements, like increasing computerisation and the arrival of the high-speed Inter-City 125s. But while television advertisements told of an 'Age of the Train', Monday morning misery continued for many, the commuter experience steadily worsening as rolling stock aged and grew ever more uncomfortable. Even when BR launched new electrification schemes and new suburban trains in the 1980s, focus still fell on the problems that beset the Advanced Passenger Train, whose ignominious end came under full media glare. In British Railways in the 1970s and '80s, Greg Morse guides us through a world of Traveller's Fare, concrete concourses and peak-capped porters, a difficult period that began with the aftershock of Beeching but ended with BR becoming the first nationalised passenger network in the world to make a profit.
The Clayton Type 1 Bo-Bo Diesel-Electric Locomotives - British Railways Class 17

Author: Anthony P Sayer

Publisher: Pen and Sword Transport

ISBN: 9781526762030

Category: Transportation

Page: 378

View: 841

The Claytons were originally conceived as the British Railways “standard” Type 1 diesel-electric locomotive, superseding other Type 1 classes delivered as part of the ‘Pilot Scheme’ fleet. The early classes suffered from poor driver visibility, and the plan from 1962 was for subsequent trip-freight and local yard shunting locomotives to be center-cab machines with low bonnets to dramatically improve visibility. To this extent the Claytons were highly successful and popular with operating crews. However, the largely untested high-speed, flat Paxman engines proved to be highly problematical, resulting in deliveries being curtailed after 117 locomotives. Further requirements for Type 1 locomotives after 1965 were met by reverting to one of the original ‘Pilot’ designs! Deteriorating traffic levels ultimately led to the Claytons being withdrawn from BR service by December 1971. Considerable amounts of archive material have been unearthed to enable the issues surrounding the rise and fall of the ‘Standard Type 1’ locomotives to be fully explored. Further sources provide insights into the effort and money expended on the Claytons in a desperate attempt to improve their reliability. Individual locomotive record cards, together with personal sighting information, allow histories of each class member to be developed including allocations, works visits, liveries and disposal details. Supported by over 280 photographs and diagrams, dramatic new insights into this troubled class have been assembled for both historians and modelers alike.