British Steam: BR Standard Locomotives

Author: Fred Kerr

Publisher: Casemate Publishers

ISBN: 9781783408016

Category: Transportation

Page: 208

View: 666

After WWII the existing railway companies were all put into the control of the newly formed British Transport Commission and that government organization spawned British Railways, which came into being on 1st January 1948. The railway infrastructure had suffered badly during the war years and most of the steam locomotives were 'tired' and badly maintained and or life expired. Although the management of British Railways was already planning to replace steam power with diesel and electric engines/units they still took a decision to build more steam locomotives (as a stop gap). Some 999 (yes just 1 short) Standard locomotives were built in 12 classes ranging from super powerful express and freight engine to suburban tank locomotives. The locomotives were mainly in good order when the order came in 1968 to end steam, some only 8 years old.There still exists a fleet of 46 preserved Standards of which 75% are in working order in and around the UKs preserved railways, furthermore 3 new build standard locomotives are proposed. Steam fans who were around in the 1960s all remember the 'Standards'.
British Steam BR Standard Locomotives

Author: Keith Langston

Publisher: Casemate Publishers

ISBN: 9781845631468

Category: Transportation

Page: 208

View: 216

After WWII the existing railway companies were all put into the control of the newly formed British Transport Commission and that government organization spawned British Railways, which came into being on 1st January 1948. The railway infrastructure had suffered badly during the war years and most of the steam locomotives were 'tired' and badly maintained and or life expired. Although the management of British Railways was already planning to replace steam power with diesel and electric engines/units they still took a decision to build more steam locomotives (as a stop gap). Some 999 (yes just 1 short) Standard locomotives were built in 12 classes ranging from super powerful express and freight engine to suburban tank locomotives. The locomotives were mainly in good order when the order came in 1968 to end steam, some only 8 years old.There still exists a fleet of 46 preserved Standards of which 75% are in working order in and around the UKs preserved railways, furthermore 3 new build standard locomotives are proposed. Steam fans who were around in the 1960s all remember the 'Standards'.
A Detailed History of British Railways Standard Steam Locomotives

Author: John Walford

Publisher:

ISBN: 0901115975

Category: Locomotives

Page: 0

View: 901

This book represents the final stage in the Society's quest to present the complete story of British locomotive standardisation to culminate in the twelve BR Standard designs that totalled 999 engines. This final publication covers a number of topics and using papers from the Mr. R. Bond and Mr. G. Dow collections the book asks whether the Standard project was required and what happened to it, how the locomotive works of the UK handled repairs and developments of various locomotive types including comparison of Standards with existing designs. There are sections on the naming policy adopted in regard to specifically Britannias, how the shed and shed code system had developed but in particular with reference to dealing with the Standard classes. A further lengthy section deals with Locomotive Performance and shows various comparisons with other locomotive types. More repair tables have been provided following feedback from earlier volumes and inevitably this book provides a list of amendments and correction to the previous four volumes. In a major departure for the society this book features all colour photographs of Standard locomotives in traffic, many not seen in print before.This volume represents the comprehensive conclusion to the series and draws a line under many questions asked about the Standards.
British Steam: Military Connections

Author: Fred Kerr

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 9781473853300

Category: Transportation

Page: 240

View: 181

In Great Britain there existed a practice of naming steam locomotives. The names chosen covered many and varied subjects, however a large number of those represented direct links with military personnel, regiments, squadrons, naval vessels, aircraft, battles and associated historic events. For example, all but one member of the famous Royal Scot class were named in honor of British regiments. Also the Southern Railway created a Battle of Britain class of locomotives, which were named in recognition of Battle of Britain squadrons, airfields, aircraft and personnel. In addition, the Great Western Railway renamed some of its engines after Second World War aircraft. The tradition has continued into modern times as the newly built A1 class locomotive is named Tornado in recognition of the jet fighter aircraft of the same name. This generously illustrated publication highlights the relevant steam locomotives and additionally examines the origin of the military names.
British Rail Steam Locomotives

Author: Source Wikipedia

Publisher: University-Press.org

ISBN: 1230833897

Category:

Page: 32

View: 185

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 30. Chapters: British Railways standard classes, BR Standard Class 6, BR Standard Class 7, BR Standard Class 9F, BR Standard Class 8, Steam locomotives of British Railways, BR Standard Class 4 2-6-4T, BR Standard Class 3 2-6-2T, BR standard class 9F 92220 Evening Star, BR Standard Class 4 2-6-0, List of BR 'Britannia' Class locomotives, BR standard class 7 70013 Oliver Cromwell, BR standard class 5, BR Standard Class 2 2-6-2T, BR Standard Class 2 2-6-0, BR standard class 4 4-6-0, BR Standard Class 3 2-6-0, BR Standard Class 5 73050, List of British Railways steam locomotives as of 31 December 1967, BR standard class 7 70000 Britannia, BR Standard Class 5 73129, BR Standard Class 5 73096, List of BR 'Clan' Class locomotives, BR Standard Class 5 73156, BR standard class 7 70048 The Territorial Army 1908-1958, BR Standard Class 5 73082 Camelot. Excerpt: The Standard class 6, otherwise known as the Clan Class, was a class of 4-6-2 Pacific tender steam locomotive designed by Robert Riddles for use by British Railways. Ten locomotives were constructed between 1951 and 1952, with a further 15 planned for construction. However, due to acute steel shortages in Britain, the order was continually postponed until it was finally cancelled on the publication of the 1955 Modernisation Plan for the re-equipment of British Railways. The Clan Class was based upon the Britannia Class design, incorporating a smaller boiler and various weight-saving measures to increase the route availability of a Pacific-type locomotive for its intended area of operations, the west of Scotland. The Clan Class received a mixed reception from crews, with those regularly operating the locomotives giving favourable reports as regards performance. However, trials in other areas of the British Railways network returned negative feedback, a common complaint being that...
British Steam Patriots

Author: Keith Langston

Publisher: Casemate Publishers

ISBN: 9781845631451

Category: Transportation

Page: 165

View: 682

The Patriot class, often referred to as 'Baby Scots', were an immediate success displaying consistently good performance. The class was withdrawn over a two year period between 1960 and 1962 having all covered around 1.3 million miles each, unfortunately too early to be considered for preservation. The last two withdrawn were in good condition on withdrawal, but unfortunately all were scrapped.Although no Patriot in either rebuilt or unrebuilt forms survived into preservation a new 'Patriot' is under construction at the Llangollen Railway. The LMS-Patriot Project, a registered charity, is appealing for donations or regular contributions to build the new, 3 cylinder, Fowler designed, parallel boiler, 4-6-0 express passenger loco.Although mostly new, the group will use the leading wheel sets from two LMS 8F locomotives. An unrestored surviving LMS Fowler tender from Woodham Brothers Barry scrap yard will also be used for the project. The new build Patriot is being assembled at the Llangollen Railway Works, and will carry the number of the last built - LMS number 5551 or British Railways number 45551. After a public poll, the new Patriot locomotive will be named The Unknown Warrior, whose tomb is located in Westminster Abbey.The new Royal British Legion backed engine will be launched in late 2011 or early 2012 and this is the only 'official' book of the project. Containing hundreds of new, never before published photographs, British Steam - Patriot will tell the story of the engine from its original concept, follow its production throughout the building period and also its launch.The book will be endorsed by the Royal British Legion and promoted to all its members. This will be a must for all railway enthusiasts.
British Steam: Pacific Power

Author: Fred Kerr

Publisher: Casemate Publishers

ISBN: 9781783469239

Category: Transportation

Page: 208

View: 958

Pacific, collectively a name applied to steam locomotives with a 4-6-2 wheel arrangement is perhaps more commonly associated with express passenger engines but that is not the whole story, there were also Pacific Tank Engines. The LNER is famously associated with their streamlined Gresley A4 Pacific locomotives and that most celebrated of locomotives, Flying Scotsman. The new build Pacific Tornado has raised the profile of the 4-6-2 type to even greater heights. The LMS produced powerful Pacific locomotives to a Stanier design; whilst the Southern Railway constructed Bullied air smoothed 4-6-2 engines. The GWR, who built Britains first Pacific type, actually entered the BR era without a 4-6-2 type on their stock list! However Riddles included 4-6-2 engines in his multi regional BR Standard range. The locomotive specifications are illustrated and presented in a manner which will appeal equally to enthusiasts, model makers and railway historians.
British Steam Locomotives Before Preservation

Author: Malcolm Clegg

Publisher: Pen and Sword Transport

ISBN: 9781526760494

Category: Transportation

Page: 168

View: 619

British Steam Locomotives Before Preservation, covers the history in pictorial form of steam locomotives that are now preserved as part of the national collection. Those which can be found in private collections and the ones which adorn the various heritage railways which operate throughout Britain. The book looks at each subject both in its working life and during its subsequent preservation. The pictorial content covers a wide swathe of Britain during the years before the heritage locomotives, were earmarked for preservation.
The Last Days of British Steam

Author: Malcolm Clegg

Publisher: Pen and Sword Transport

ISBN: 9781526760456

Category: Transportation

Page: 144

View: 977

This volume covers the final decade of British steam, looking at steam traction in a wide variety of geographical locations around the British Railways network. The book covers a wide variety of classes of locomotives, that were withdrawn during the last decade of steam traction, some of which examples are now preserved. Malcolm Clegg, has been taking railway pictures since the early 1960s and has access to collections taken by friends who were recording the steam railway scene during this period. This book is a record of his and other peoples journeys during the last decade of steam in the 1960s.
A Detailed History of British Railways Standard Steam Locomotives: The 9F 2-10-0 class

Author: John Walford

Publisher:

ISBN: 0901115959

Category: Locomotives

Page: 0

View: 733

John Walford and Paul Harrison present the complete story of the powerful and successful Class 9Fs. Enthusiasts will find this book a delight as the engines were allocated to more than 60 depots and worked nationwide. Full details of each engine's construction, allocation and use, modification and disposal and a chapter on the 9 preserved engines is included .
Steam, Soot and Rust

Author: Colin Garratt

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 9781473844124

Category: Transportation

Page: 160

View: 131

The disappearance of the steam locomotive in the land of its birth touched the hearts of millions, but when the government announced the Modernisation Plan for Britain's railways in 1955, under which steam was to be phased out in favour of diesel and electric traction, few people took it seriously. Steam locomotives were an integral part of our daily lives and had been for almost one and a half centuries. Furthermore, they were still being built in large numbers. It was popularly believed that they would see the century out and probably well beyond that. But the reality was that by 1968 Ð a mere thirteen years after the Modernisation Plan Ð steam traction had disappeared from Britain's main line railways. It was harrowing to witness the breaking up of engines, which were the icons of their day, capable of working long-distance inter-city expresses weighing 400 tons on schedules faster than a mile a minute. Top speeds of 100mph were not unknown. This book chronicles the last few years as scrap yards all over Britain went into overtime, cutting up thousands of locomotives and releasing a bounty of more than a million tons of scrap whilst the engines, which remained in service, were a shadow of their former selves; filthy, wheezing and clanking their way to an ignominious end. The pictures in this book are augmented by essays written by Colin Garratt at the time. Although steam disappeared from the main line network it survives in everÐdwindling numbers on industrial systems such as collieries, ironstone mines, power stations, shipyards, sugar factories, paper mills and docks. In such environments steam traction eked out a further decade and during this time many of the industrial locations closed rendering the locomotives redundant. The British steam locomotive was born amid the coalfields and was destined to die there one and three quarter centuries later.