Children of Incarcerated Parents

Author: Yvette R. Harris, PhD

Publisher: Springer Publishing Company

ISBN: 0826105149

Category: Psychology

Page: 320

View: 205

"This important book covers developmental outcomes of children in this predicament, parenting from prison, and family reunification. It is filled with research findings and addresses clinical issues as well. Many children are affected by a parent in the criminal justice system, and this book is sorely needed. The editors and contributors have produced a wonderful resource." Score: 94, 4 stars --Doody's This book serves as a comprehensive source for understanding and intervening with children of incarcerated parents. The text examines the daunting clinical implications inherent in trauma throughout development, as well as social and political roles in ameliorating intergenerational delinquency. It conceptualizes the problem by using an ecological framework that is focused on the experience of the child. Children of Incarcerated Parents addresses developmental and clinical issues experienced throughout the trajectory of childhood and adolescence with a focus on interventions and social policies to improve outcomes for this under-studied group. The chapters explore individual, community, and national levels of policy, programming, and legislation.
Children’s Contact with Incarcerated Parents

Author: Julie Poehlmann-Tynan

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319166254

Category: Psychology

Page: 115

View: 825

​This Brief explores the potential effects of parent-child contact during incarceration on child and adult relationships, well-being, and parenting as well as corrections-related issues, such as institutional behavior and recidivism. It presents a literature review on what is currently known about parent-child contact during parental incarceration in addition to several empirical studies, followed by a summary, commentary, and briefing report. The empirical studies focus on contact in both jail and prison settings. Because jails in the United States handle more admissions per year than prisons – and studies of jailed parents and their children are not common in the literature – two of the three studies presented focus on jails. Following the empirical studies, a summary that includes recommendations for policy and intervention is presented, along with a commentary that explores what researchers need to do to make effective policy recommendations. This Brief is an essential resource for policy makers and related professionals, graduate students, and researchers in child and school psychology, family studies, public health, social work, law/criminal justice, and sociology.​
Children of Incarcerated Parents

Author: Judy Krysik

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030847135

Category: Children of prisoners

Page: 286

View: 375

This book presents multidimensional knowledge on children of incarcerated parents using Bronfenbrenners ecological theory as an organizing framework. It examines the extent to which different levels of the environment are supportive (i.e., leading to resilience) and stress-producing (i.e., contributing to risk). The volume explores four levels of the environment microsystem, mesosystem, exosystem, and macrosystem with specific theories and paradigms woven into the inquiry at each. At the level of child and family, it discusses the factors that influence resilience and risk in children from gestation through young adulthood; at the community level, it addresses risk and resilience in the interactions between children and families and the various systems with which they interact (e.g., child welfare). Key areas of coverage include: A description of the factors that influence the quality of programming for children and their families. A critical analysis of state and national policies that affect which individuals receive, or fail to receive, specific services. An overview and evaluation of the state of knowledge and implications for research and practice to improve outcomes for children of incarcerated parents. An organizing framework to help researchers identify gaps in the existing knowledge base and distills and organizes evidence-based information for practitioners. Children of Incarcerated Parents is an essential resource for researchers, professors, and graduate students as well as practitioners, therapists, and other professionals in child and school psychology, family studies, public health, and all interrelated disciplines, including developmental psychology, criminal justice, social work, educational policy and politics.
Handbook on Children with Incarcerated Parents

Author: J. Mark Eddy

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030167073

Category: Psychology

Page: 386

View: 963

The second edition of this handbook examines family life, health, and educational issues that often arise for the millions of children in the United States whose parents are in prison or jail. It details how these youth are more likely to exhibit behavior problems such as aggression, substance abuse, learning difficulties, mental health concerns, and physical health issues. It also examines resilience and how children and families thrive even in the face of multiple challenges related to parental incarceration. Chapters integrate diverse; interdisciplinary; and rapidly expanding literature and synthesizes rigorous scholarship to address the needs of children from multiple perspectives, including child welfare; education; health care; mental health; law enforcement; corrections; and law. The handbook concludes with a chapter that explores new directions in research, policy, and practice to improve the life chances of children with incarcerated parents. Topics featured in this handbook include: Findings from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study. How parental incarceration contributes to racial and ethnic disparities and inequality. Parent-child visits when parents are incarcerated in prison or jail. Approaches to empowering incarcerated parents of color and their families. International advances for incarcerated parents and their children. The second edition of the Handbook on Children with Incarcerated Parents is an essential reference for researchers, professors, clinicians/practitioners, and graduate students across developmental psychology, criminology, sociology, law, psychiatry, social work, public health, human development, and family studies. “This important new volume provides a cutting-edge update of research on the impact of incarceration on family life. The book will be an essential reference for researchers and practitioners working at the intersections of criminal justice, poverty, and child development.” Bruce Western, Ph.D., Columbia University “The comprehensive, interdisciplinary focus of this handbook brilliantly showcases the latest research, interventions, programs, and policies relevant to the well-being of children with incarcerated parents. This edition is a ‘must-read’ for students, researchers, practitioners, and policy-makers alike who are dedicated to promoting the health and resilience of children affected by parental incarceration.” Leslie Leve, Ph.D., University of Oregon
Children of Incarcerated Parents

Author: Marian S. Harris

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351334068

Category: Medical

Page: 132

View: 203

This book highlights the myriad factors that can impact the children of incarcerated parents. It is no secret that the United States continues to be the leading nation for the incarceration of men and women, and this this large prison population includes approximately 120,000 incarcerated mothers and 1.1 million incarcerated fathers. Incarceration of a parent is recognized as an ‘adverse childhood experience’, an acute or chronic situation that for most people is stressful and potentially traumatic. Children of incarcerated parents may experience other adverse childhood experiences such as poverty, homelessness, parental substance abuse and other mental health problems, and family violence. The chapters in this book document some of the challenges as well as some promising ways that can help parents and families begin to meet these challenges. It is our hope that the compendium of chapters presented in this book will be a resource for practitioners, policy makers, educators, researchers, and advocates in their work to ensure that the children of incarcerated parents, their caregivers, and their mothers and fathers, are provided the support they need to address the challenges they face during and after parental incarceration. This book was originally published as a special issue of Smith College Studies in Social Work.
Supporting Children of Incarcerated Parents in Schools

Author: Whitney Q. Hollins

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000479126

Category: Education

Page: 136

View: 472

Drawing on qualitative research conducted with young people in New York, this volume highlights the unique experiences of children of incarcerated parents (COIP) and counters deficit-based narratives to consider how young people’s voices can inform and improve educational support services. Supporting Children of Incarcerated Parents in Schools combines the author’s original research and personal experiences with an analysis of existing scholarship to provide unique insight into how COIP experience schooling in the United States. With a focus on the benefits of qualitative research for providing a more nuanced portrayal of these children and their experiences, the text foregrounds youth voices and emphasizes the resilience, maturity, and compassion which these young people demonstrate. By calling attention to the challenges that COIP face in and out of school, and also addressing associated issues around race and racism, the book offers large and small-scale changes that educators and other allies can use to better support children of incarcerated parents. This volume will be of interest to scholars and researchers interested in the sociology of education, race and urban education, and the impacts of parental incarceration specifically. It will also be of benefit to educators and school leaders who are supporting young people affected by these issues.
Children of Incarcerated Parents

Author: Marian S Harris

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 0367892529

Category:

Page: 142

View: 931

This book highlights the myriad factors that can impact the children of incarcerated parents. It is no secret that the United States continues to be the leading nation for the incarceration of men and women, and this this large prison population includes approximately 120,000 incarcerated mothers and 1.1 million incarcerated fathers. Incarceration of a parent is recognized as an 'adverse childhood experience', an acute or chronic situation that for most people is stressful and potentially traumatic. Children of incarcerated parents may experience other adverse childhood experiences such as poverty, homelessness, parental substance abuse and other mental health problems, and family violence. The chapters in this book document some of the challenges as well as some promising ways that can help parents and families begin to meet these challenges. It is our hope that the compendium of chapters presented in this book will be a resource for practitioners, policy makers, educators, researchers, and advocates in their work to ensure that the children of incarcerated parents, their caregivers, and their mothers and fathers, are provided the support they need to address the challenges they face during and after parental incarceration. This book was originally published as a special issue of Smith College Studies in Social Work.
Children with Parents in Prison

Author: Creasie Hairston

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351528849

Category: Political Science

Page: 171

View: 633

Adults are being incarcerated in the United States at an ever-escalating rate, and child welfare professionals are encountering growing numbers of children who have parents in prison. Current estimates indicate that as many as 1.5 million children have an incarcerated parent; many thousands of others have experienced the incarceration of a parent at some point in their lives. These vulnerable children face unique difficulties, and their growing numbers and special needs demand attention.Existing literature indicates that children whose parents are incarcerated experience a variety of negative consequences, particularly in terms of their emotional health and well being. They also may have difficult interactions or limited contact with their parents. There are also issues connected with their physical care and child custody. The many challenges facing the child welfare system as it attempts to work with this population are explored in Children with Parents in Prison. Topics covered include: ""Supporting Families and Children of Mothers in Jail""; ""Meeting the Challenge of Permanency Planning for Children with Incarcerated Mothers""; ""The Impact of Changing Public Policy on Relatives Caring for Children with Incarcerated Parents""; ""Legal Issues and Recommendations""; ""Facilitating Parent-Child Contact in Correctional Settings""; ""Earning Trust from Youths with None to Spare""; ""Developing Quality Services for Offenders and Families""; and in closing, ""Understanding the Forces that Influence Incarcerated Fathers' Relationships with Their Children.""Children and families have long struggled with the difficulties created when a parent goes to prison. What is new is the magnitude of the problem. This volume calls for increased public awareness of the impact of parental incarceration on children. Its goal is to stimulate discussion about how to best meet the special needs of these children and families and how to provide a resource for the child welfare community as it responds to
Children with Incarcerated Mothers

Author: Julie Poehlmann-Tynan

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030675998

Category: Psychology

Page: 156

View: 461

This Brief focuses on children with incarcerated mothers, a growing and vulnerable population. It presents five empirical studies, along with an introduction and summary chapter. The five empirical chapters examine new qualitative and quantitative data on: Typical occurrences when pregnant women give birth during incarceration in contrast with the benefits of a prison doula program for mothers and newborns. A mother’s criminal justice involvement for substance abuse crimes and its effects on children’s protective services involvement and foster care placement. How children cope with separation from their mothers because of their incarceration and how that separation continues to affect children's lives following family reunification. Differences in recidivism trajectories between mothers and nonmothers during the 10 years following release from incarceration. Alternatives to incarceration for women in residential drug treatment and how community supervision mandates can affect, contribute to, or extend mother-child separation. The final chapter integrates the information from the empirical studies and summarizes implications for policy and practice. Children with Incarcerated Mothers is an essential resource for policy makers and related professionals, graduate students, and researchers in child and school psychology, family studies, public health, social work, law/criminal justice, and sociology.