Christian Science on Trial

Author: Rennie B. Schoepflin

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 0801870577

Category: History

Page: 334

View: 371

Tracing the movement during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Schoepflin illuminates its struggle for existence against the efforts of organized American medicine to curtail its activities.".
Christian Science on Trial

Author: Rennie B. Schoepflin

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9780801870576

Category: History

Page: 314

View: 315

Tracing the movement during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Schoepflin illuminates its struggle for existence against the efforts of organized American medicine to curtail its activities.".
When Prayer Fails

Author: Shawn Francis Peters

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780195306354

Category: Law

Page: 273

View: 513

'When Prayer Fails' examines the web of legal and ethical questions that arise when criminal prosecutions are mounted against parents whose children die as a result of religion-based medical neglect. It explores efforts to balance judicial protections for the religious liberty of faith-healers against the rights of children.
A Republic of Mind and Spirit

Author: Catherine L. Albanese

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300134773

Category: Religion

Page: 640

View: 284

In the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Mexicans and Americans joined together to transform the U.S.-Mexico borderlands into a crossroads of modern economic development. This book reveals the forgotten story of their ambitious dreams and their ultimate failure to control this fugitive terrain. Focusing on a mining region that spilled across the Arizona-Sonora border, this book shows how entrepreneurs, corporations, and statesmen tried to domesticate nature and society within a transnational context. Efforts to tame a 'wild' frontier were stymied by labour struggles, social conflict, and revolution. Fugitive Landscapes explores the making and unmaking of the U.S.-Mexico border, telling how ordinary people resisted the domination of empires, nations, and corporations to shape transnational history on their own terms. By moving beyond traditional national narratives, it offers new lessons for our own border-crossing age.
Choose Your Medicine

Author: Lewis A. Grossman

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190612771

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 795

A comprehensive history of the concept of freedom of therapeutic choice in the United States that presents a compelling look at how persistent but evolving notions of a right to therapeutic choice have affected American policy and law from the Revolution through the Trump Era. Throughout American history, lawmakers have limited the range of treatments available to patients, often with the backing of the medical establishment. The country's history is also, however, brimming with social movements that have condemned such restrictions as violations of fundamental American liberties. This fierce conflict is one of the defining features of the social history of medicine in the United States. In Choose Your Medicine, Lewis A. Grossman presents a compelling look at how persistent but evolving notions of a right to therapeutic choice have affected American health policy, law, and regulation from the Revolution through the Trump Era. Grossman grounds his analysis in historical examples ranging from unschooled supporters of botanical medicine in the early nineteenth century to sophisticated cancer patient advocacy groups in the twenty-first. He vividly describes how activists and lawyers have resisted a wide variety of legal constraints on therapeutic choice, including medical licensing statutes, FDA limitations on unapproved drugs and alternative remedies, abortion restrictions, and prohibitions against medical marijuana and physician-assisted suicide. Grossman also considers the relationship between these campaigns for desired treatments and widespread opposition to state-compelled health measures such as vaccines and face masks. From the streets of San Francisco to the US Supreme Court, Choose Your Medicine examines an underexplored theme of American history, politics, and law that is more relevant today than ever.
Metaphors in the Study of Christian Science

Author: Robert C. Goodspeed

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN: 1453579060

Category: Religion

Page: 197

View: 890

This book uncovers Mary Baker Eddys skill in seizing upon images of comparison to clarify her religious perspectives. Metaphors reveal her knowledge of nature and the arts, war and courtrooms, cities and towns, the home and farm environment, and the modern inventions of her day, nineteenth century America. What did Jesus, among others, and Mary Baker Eddy, see in teaching by parable, allegory, and metaphor? This book is not a biography, but sheds light on Eddy as a person you will want to get to know. Seeing her through her metaphors will complement the insights that the biographies supply. This book will renew your appreciation of metaphors which use objects, persons, and places to convey spiritual ideas, moving us from known specifics to unknown abstractions. Jesus chose language specifically targeting his audience, the likes of farmers, shepherds, and fishermen. Eddy in turn targeted her audience of consumers and merchants. All her symbols were well known in the nineteenth century. The excerpts are drawn from the Bible, Eddys writings, and the Christian Science Hymnal. As author and compiler, I am sure you will gain much from the read. What a treat!
Religion, Law, and the Medical Neglect of Children in the United States, 1870–2000

Author: Lynne Curry

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783030246891

Category: History

Page: 197

View: 634

Drawing upon a diverse range of archival evidence, medical treatises, religious texts, public discourses, and legal documents, this book examines the rich historical context in which controversies surrounding the medical neglect of children erupted onto the American scene. It argues that several nineteenth-century developments collided to produce the first criminal prosecutions of parents who rejected medical attendance as a tenet of their religious faith. A view of children as distinct biological beings with particularized needs for physical care had engendered both the new medical practice field of pediatrics and a vigorous child welfare movement that forced legislatures and courts to reconsider public and private responsibility for ensuring children’s physical well-being. At the same time, a number of healing religions had emerged to challenge the growing authority of medical doctors and the appropriate role of the state in the realm of child welfare. The rapid proliferation of the new healing churches, and the mixed outcomes of parents’ criminal trials, reflected ongoing uneasiness about the increasing presence of science in American life.

Bad Faith

Bad Faith

Author: Paul A Offit

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9780465040612

Category: Medical

Page: 272

View: 642

In recent years, there have been major outbreaks of whooping cough among children in California, mumps in New York, and measles in Ohio's Amish country -- despite the fact that these are all vaccine-preventable diseases. Although America is the most medically advanced place in the world, many people disregard modern medicine in favor of using their faith to fight life threatening illnesses. Christian Scientists pray for healing instead of going to the doctor, Jehovah's Witnesses refuse blood transfusions, and ultra-Orthodox Jewish mohels spread herpes by using a primitive ritual to clean the wound. Tragically, children suffer and die every year from treatable diseases, and in most states it is legal for parents to deny their children care for religious reasons. In twenty-first century America, how could this be happening? In Bad Faith, acclaimed physician and author Dr. Paul Offit gives readers a never-before-seen look into the minds of those who choose to medically martyr themselves, or their children, in the name of religion. Offit chronicles the stories of these faithful and their children, whose devastating experiences highlight the tangled relationship between religion and medicine in America. Religious or not, this issue reaches everyone -- whether you are seeking treatment at a Catholic hospital or trying to keep your kids safe from diseases spread by their unvaccinated peers. Replete with vivid storytelling and complex, compelling characters, Bad Faith makes a strenuous case that denying medicine to children in the name of religion isn't't just unwise and immoral, but a rejection of the very best aspects of what belief itself has to offer.