Dangerous Neighbors

Author: James Alexander Dun

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812248319

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 915

Dangerous Neighbors shows how the Haitian Revolution permeated early American print culture and had a profound impact on the young nation's domestic politics. Focusing on Philadelphia as both a representative and an influential vantage point, it follows contemporary American reactions to the events through which the French colony of Saint Domingue was destroyed and the independent nation of Haiti emerged. Philadelphians made sense of the news from Saint Domingue with local and national political developments in mind and with the French Revolution and British abolition debates ringing in their ears. In witnessing a French colony experience a revolution of African slaves, they made the colony serve as powerful and persuasive evidence in domestic discussions over the meaning of citizenship, equality of rights, and the fate of slavery. Through extensive use of manuscript sources, newspapers, and printed literature, Dun uncovers the wide range of opinion and debate about events in Saint Domingue in the early republic. By focusing on both the meanings Americans gave to those events and the uses they put them to, he reveals a fluid understanding of the American Revolution and the polity it had produced, one in which various groups were making sense of their new nation in relation to both its own past and a revolution unfolding before them. Zeroing in on Philadelphia—a revolutionary center and an enclave of antislavery activity—Dun collapses the supposed geographic and political boundaries that separated the American republic from the West Indies and Europe.
Dangerous Neighbors: Volcanoes and Cities

Author: Grant Heiken

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107435155

Category: Science

Page: 204

View: 197

What are the real risks posed by a volcanic eruption near a city – what is fact and what is myth? How have volcanic eruptions affected cities in the past, and how can we learn from these events? Why do communities continue to develop in such locations, despite the obvious threat? In this fascinating book, Grant Heiken explores global examples of cities at risk from volcanoes, from Italy, the US, Mexico, Ecuador, The Philippines, Japan and New Zealand, providing historical and contemporary eruption case studies to illustrate volcanic hazards, and cities' efforts to respond to them, both good and poor. He shows that truly successful volcanic hazard mitigation cannot be accomplished without collaboration between experts in geology and natural hazards, public health, medicine, city and infrastructure planning, and civil protection. This is a topical and engaging read for anyone interested in the history and future activity of these dangerous neighbors.
Dangerous Neighborhood

Author: Michael Radu

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351523714

Category: Political Science

Page: 240

View: 911

Contemporary Turkish politics have long been roiled by cultural and social debates rooted in the legacy of modernization initiated in the 1920s by Mustafa Kemal Atati?1/2rk. Islamist challenges to Ataturk's secularism, to political corruption and economic inefficiency, and debates over the meaning of human rights, all remain open to argument-in Ankara as well as elsewhere. Undoubtedly they exert influence on Turkey's position in world affairs and reinforce its double identity between the West and the Islamic world. Dangerous Neighborhood examines Turkish foreign policy problems, both with its immediate neighbors in the Caucasus and Middle East and in its essential strategic relations with the European Union and the United States. How important is Washington for Turkey's strategic interests, considering its controversial relations with the European Union? The Kurdish problem has affected Turkey's bid for EU membership, and also its relations with the United States as the war on terrorism is pursued. Are Turkish values and national interests, based on the legacy of Atati?1/2rk, compatible with minority rights, as defined by the European Union, and if not, why not? Moreover, is there any advantage to Turkey in joining the European Union, or is the price too high, relating to human rights concessions and legal issues? These important questions are examined in this volume. In the Caucasus, Turkey is an important factor, if for no other reason than its size and common borders. Turkey's role, whether Ankara likes it or not, remains important for both Russian ambitions and local ethnic groups seeking either autonomy or independence-Chechens, Abkhaz, Circassians, among others. Ankara's dilemma is whether to support co-nationals and co-religionists or to seek normal relations with Moscow. The solution to this dilemma is debated in this volume. In other parts of the world, Turkey also plays a central role. For example, Ankara's close military and political relations with Israel contribute to a different strategic and military balance in the Middle East. Turkey's views are seldom made public, and few Turks have believed it is important to present their case. This book, with contributors from Turkey as well as the West, is intended in part to broaden understanding of Turkey's position. Dangerous Neighborhood will be of interest to political scientists, foreign policy analysts, and Middle East specialists..
Good Neighbors

Author: Sylvie Tissot

Publisher: Verso Books

ISBN: 9781781689509

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 189

What we talk about when we talk about gentrification Does gentrification destroy diversity? Or does it thrive on it? Boston’s South End, a legendary working-class neighborhood with the largest Victorian brick row house district in the United States and a celebrated reputation for diversity, has become in recent years a flashpoint for the problems of gentrification. It has born witness to the kind of rapid transformation leading to pitched battles over the class and race politics throughout the country and indeed the contemporary world. This subtle study of a storied urban neighborhood reveals the way that upper-middle-class newcomers have positioned themselves as champions of diversity, and how their mobilization around this key concept has reordered class divisions rather than abolished them.
Neighbors and Strangers

Author: William R. Polk

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226673318

Category: Political Science

Page: 376

View: 115

How important are foreign affairs in the grand scheme of civilization? Do defenses against the invasion of strangers influence the evolution of culture? Drawing on decades of experience in government as well as in the academy, William R. Polk offers a uniquely informed, comprehensive view of foreign relations. Bridging academic disciplines he treats foreign affairs as they occur in the real world. Instead of separating diplomacy, intelligence and espionage, defense and warfare, trade and aid, intervention and law from one another, he shows how they interact and together form a whole pattern with which we must deal if we are to move safely into the 21st century. But Neighbors and Strangers is not just a guide to the future; Polk draws upon all recorded history, and indeed upon studies of animal and primitive social behavior, and from the entire world for vivid examples to illuminate for the general reader the underlying principles and consistencies that characterize relations with foreigners. Indeed, going deeper into the human experience, Polk documents "fear of the foreigner" as a visceral response so deep-seated and so pervasive that it transcends human memory, individual experience and even logical analysis. More generally, he shows that the tension created by having to live as neighbors with those who, in the definition of contemporaries, were irredeemably alien has been one of the major causes of the rise of civilizations. Accessible and engaging, Neighbors and Strangers is a revelatory look at how foreign affairs are a profound reflection of human nature.
The Hasmoneans and Their Neighbors

Author: Kenneth Atkinson

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9780567680839

Category: Religion

Page: 232

View: 689

Kenneth Atkinson adds to an already impressive body of work on the Hasmoneans, proposing that the history and theological beliefs of Jews during the period of the Hasmonean state cannot be understood without a close investigation of the histories of the Ptolemaic and Seleucid Empires, as well as the Roman Republic. Citing evidence from the Dead Sea Scrolls and classical sources, Atkinson offers a new reconstruction of this vital historical period, when the Hasmonean family changed the fates of their neighbors, the Roman Republic, the religion of Judaism, and created the foundation for the development of the nascent Christian faith. Atkinson additionally provides reconstructions of events in classical history, including the most detailed examination of Pompey the Great's assassination in light of Jewish sources; by focusing on his death, this volume uncovers new information that explains the discrepancies in the classical accounts of this pivotal event that shaped Middle Eastern and Roman history, and which helped end the Republic. Collecting sources ranging from the beginning of the Hasmonean monarchy, through its religious strife and golden age, to its eventual downfall, Atkinson concludes that that Jewish sectarianism and messianism played far greater roles in the Hasmonean state than has previously be assumed.
Neighbor Networks

Author: Ronald S. Burt

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191610097

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 410

View: 350

There is a moral to this book, a bit of Confucian wisdom often ignored in social network analysis: "Worry not that no one knows you, seek to be worth knowing." This advice is contrary to the usual social network emphasis on securing relations with well-connected people. Neighbor Networks examines the cases of analysts, bankers, and managers, and finds that rewards, in fact, do go to people with well-connected colleagues. Look around your organization. The individuals doing well tend to be affiliated with well-connected colleagues. However, the advantage obvious to the naked eye is misleading. It disappears when an individual's own characteristics are held constant. Well-connected people do not have to affiliate with people who have nothing to offer. This book shows that affiliation with well-connected people adds stability but no advantage to a person's own connections. Advantage is concentrated in people who are themselves well connected. This book is a trail of argument and evidence that leads to the conclusion that individuals make a lot of their own network advantage. The social psychology of networks moves to center stage and personal responsibility emerges as a key theme. In the end, the social is affirmed, but with an emphasis on individual agency and the social psychology of networks. The research gives new emphasis to Coleman's initial image of social capital as a forcing function for human capital. This book is for academics and researchers of organizational and network studies interested in a new angle on familiar data, and as a supplemental reading in graduate courses on social networks, stratification, or organizations. A variety of research settings are studied, and diverse theoretical perspectives are taken. The book's argument and evidence are supported by ample appendices for readers interested in background details.
A Neighborhood Divided

Author: Jane Balin

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9781501720826

Category: Social Science

Page: 192

View: 668

When a nursing facility for AIDS patients is planned for a city neighborhood, residents might be expected to respond, "Not in my backyard." But, as Jane Balin recounts in A Neighborhood Divided, when that community is known for its racial and ethnic diversity and liberal attitudes, public reaction becomes less predictable and in many ways more important to comprehend. An ethnographer who spent two years talking with inhabitants of a progressive neighborhood facing this prospect, Jane Balin demonstrates that the controversy divided residents in surprising ways. She discovered that those most strongly opposed to the facility lived furthest away, that families with young children were evenly represented in the two camps, and that African Americans followed a Jewish community leader in opposing the home while dismissing their own minister's support of it. By viewing each side sympathetically and allowing participants to express their true feelings about AIDS, the author invites readers to recognize their own anxieties over this sensitive issue. Balin's insightful work stresses the importance of uncovering the ideologies and fears of middle-class Americans in order to understand the range of responses that AIDS has provoked in our society. Its ethnographic approach expands the parameters of NIMBY research, offering a clearer picture of the multi-faceted anxieties that drive responses to AIDS at both the local and national levels.