Hansard's Parliamentary Debates, Vol. 53

Author: Great Britain Parliament

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN: 0243252153

Category: History

Page: 722

View: 976

Excerpt from Hansard's Parliamentary Debates, Vol. 53: Commencing With the Accession on William IV.; 3 Victoriae, 1840; Comprising the Period From the Twenty-Fourth Day of March, to the Eleventh Day of May, 1840 Sir H. Verney said, that at present agricultural counties might refuse the bill of last Session, and say, We won't have it, because of the expense; and he thought, if that was remedied, it would be be of great advantage, and render the bill a good bill. The whole country contributed towards the aggregate amount of crime, and the whole country should contri bute to suppress it. Besides, generally in the larger towns, the police had driven the greatest vagabonds from them into the country, and therefore he thought all the country ought fairly to bear its proportion of the burden - establishing a good police in the country for suppressing the ge neral amount of crime. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.
Hansard's Parliamentary Debates; Third Series, Commencing With the Accession of William IV.; 39 Victoriæ, 1875, Vol. 226

Author: Great Britain Parliament

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN: 1528558863

Category: Reference

Page: 626

View: 184

Excerpt from Hansard's Parliamentary Debates; Third Series, Commencing With the Accession of William IV.; 39 Victoriæ, 1875, Vol. 226: Comprising the Period From the Twenty-Sixth Day of July 1875, to the Thirteenth Day of August 1875 Amendment moved, in Clauses 4 and 5, page 2, lines 10 and 36, to leave out of - (the Earl of Rosebery. - After short debate, on Question? Their Lordships divided, Contents 17, not-contents 24, Majority 7 - Resolved In the Negative. Further Amendments made; Bill to be read 3' on Thursday next; and to be printed, as amended. (no. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.
Transnational Soldiers

Author: N. Arielli

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137296634

Category: History

Page: 263

View: 633

Warfare in the modern era has often been described in terms of national armies fighting national wars. This volume challenges the view by examining transnational aspects of military mobilization from the eighteenth century to the present. Truly global in scope, it offers an alternative way of reading the military history of the last 250 years.
Iron Curtain

Author: Patrick Wright

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199239689

Category: History

Page: 507

View: 210

'From Stettin in the Baltic to Trieste in the Adriatic an iron curtain has descended across the Continent. . .' With these words Winston Churchill famously warned the world in a now legendary speech given in Fulton, Missouri, on March 5, 1946. Launched as an evocative metaphor, the 'Iron Curtain' quickly became a brutal reality in the Cold War between Capitalist West and Communist East. Not surprisingly, for many years, people on both sides of the division have assumed that the story of the Iron Curtain began with Churchill's 1946 speech.In this fascinating investigation, Patrick Wright shows that this was decidedly not the case. Starting with its original use to describe an anti-fire device fitted into theatres, Iron Curtain tells the story of how the term evolved into such a powerful metaphor and the myriad ways in which it shapedthe world for decades before the onset of the Cold War. Along the way, it offers fascinating perspectives on a rich array of historical characters and developments, from the lofty aspirations and disappointed fate of early twentieth century internationalists, through the topsy-turvy experiences of the first travellers to Soviet Russia, to thetheatricalization of modern politics and international relations. And, as Wright poignantly suggests, the term captures a particular way of thinking about the world that long pre-dates the Cold War - and did not disappear with the fall of the Berlin Wall.
The End of the Urban Ancient Regime in England

Author: Frédéric Moret

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 9781443874014

Category: History

Page: 375

View: 449

The 1835 Municipal Reform Act is both a consequence and a continuation of the 1832 Reform Act. By dealing with those “citadels of Torysm” that were the municipal corporations, the Whigs not only wanted to confirm their electoral victory, but also to reform the local system that had been largely criticised for decades. Preceding the reform, a thorough investigation was conducted by a group of twenty commissioners – young liberal or radical lawyers – who visited 285 municipal corporations in England and Wales. After public hearings, they wrote, for each borough, a detailed report which provided an accurate picture of the municipal institutions and their functioning over the preceding decades. In describing the political organisation, the administration, the legal and law enforcement functions, the reports showed that the municipal corporations were areas of privileges. Beyond the overview provided by those in favour of reform of a system at breaking point, the reports, while taking into account local situations, measured the role played in urban management by municipal corporations. After an extensive campaign and several petitions, the parliamentary debate resulted in a compromise bill that aimed at reforming only the main royal boroughs. Small towns, as well as large industrial cities, which had not been granted the royal charter of incorporation, were not affected by the reform. Though it carefully treated certain former institutions, the municipal reform fundamentally altered the way administration was run and marked the end of the urban Ancient Regime in England and in Wales.