How to Become an Effective Course Director

Author: Bruce W. Newton

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0387849041

Category: Education

Page: 87

View: 962

Which Way Does Your Desk Face? Early in my tenure as a medical neuroscience course director, I started receiving comments on student evaluations stating that I was “unapproachable”. For the ten years prior to becoming the course director I taught full-time in the gross anatomy course and gave lectures in the medical neuroscience, histology and embryology courses. This amounted to over 130 student contact hours per year, during which time I had not received negative comments concerning “approachability”. At the start of my third year as the medical neuroscience course director, I asked Dr. P- rick Tank, who was, and still is, the gross anatomy course director, why I was g- ting such comments. He looked up at me while I was standing in his office do- way and simply said, “Which way does your desk face?” He then explained to me how he had arranged his office so that when he sat at his desk he faced the door to give students his immediate attention when they came to see him. My desk and chair faced the window, putting my back to the students. He stated that while my office arrangement avoided annoying refl- tions on my computer monitor, it sent an unintended message to the students that I did not consider them a priority. Once I moved my desk so that my chair faced the door the perception of me as being unapproachable was resolved.
How to Become an Effective Course Director

Author: Bruce W. Newton

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9780387849058

Category: Education

Page: 87

View: 958

Which Way Does Your Desk Face? Early in my tenure as a medical neuroscience course director, I started receiving comments on student evaluations stating that I was “unapproachable”. For the ten years prior to becoming the course director I taught full-time in the gross anatomy course and gave lectures in the medical neuroscience, histology and embryology courses. This amounted to over 130 student contact hours per year, during which time I had not received negative comments concerning “approachability”. At the start of my third year as the medical neuroscience course director, I asked Dr. P- rick Tank, who was, and still is, the gross anatomy course director, why I was g- ting such comments. He looked up at me while I was standing in his office do- way and simply said, “Which way does your desk face?” He then explained to me how he had arranged his office so that when he sat at his desk he faced the door to give students his immediate attention when they came to see him. My desk and chair faced the window, putting my back to the students. He stated that while my office arrangement avoided annoying refl- tions on my computer monitor, it sent an unintended message to the students that I did not consider them a priority. Once I moved my desk so that my chair faced the door the perception of me as being unapproachable was resolved.

Scouting

Scouting

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 600

View: 283

Published by the Boy Scouts of America for all BSA registered adult volunteers and professionals, Scouting magazine offers editorial content that is a mixture of information, instruction, and inspiration, designed to strengthen readers' abilities to better perform their leadership roles in Scouting and also to assist them as parents in strengthening families.
Infant and young child feeding counselling: an integrated course. Director's guide

Author:

Publisher: World Health Organization

ISBN: 9789240031692

Category: Medical

Page:

View: 377

Breastfeeding and appropriate, safe and timely complementary feeding are fundamental to the health and development of children, and important for the health of their mothers. All health workers who care for women and children during the postnatal period and beyond have a key role to play in establishing and sustaining breastfeeding and appropriate complementary feeding. This guide, which is an update of the version published in 2005, enables course directors to create a customized training package that will respond directly to the specific learning needs of their health workers. The training modules cover a range of topics, including breastfeeding, complementary feeding, growth assessment and monitoring, HIV and infant feeding, and infant and young child feeding counselling.
The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Curriculum for the Twenty-first Century

Author: Catherine D. De Angelis

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 0801863503

Category: Medical

Page: 272

View: 246

"Our basic philosophy of medical education must be directed not toward creating a neurosurgeon, a family practitioner, a cardiologist, or a general pediatrician but toward creating an undifferentiated 'stem cell' physician who is so well prepared that he or she is fully capable of taking any career path after medical school. Every indication is that our goal is being met. The new curriculum is preparing students for the demands and responsibilities of a new era of medicine, science, and medical arts." -- from the Foreword, by Michael M. E. Johns, M.D. The curriculum taught in many U.S. medical schools today has been altered little since 1910. Now, spurred in part by the recent sweeping changes in health care delivery, medical schools are re-evaluating their curricula. The goal is to develop a program of medical education that not only reflects the latest scientific advances but also prepares physicians in the fields and specialties society now needs. This book provides an extensive description of the process and outcome of developing a completely new curriculum at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. The book is organized around the subjects and courses taught: basic sciences, physician and society, medical informatics, and clinical medicine. Chapters also consider evaluation and reform of the curriculum. The contributors, Johns Hopkins faculty members who participated in developing the components of the curriculum, discuss differences between the old and new courses and programs, reasons for the changes, and the process used to plan and implement them. Throughout, the material is presented in a way that permits easy generalization and adaptation to other medical schools. Contributors: Catherine D. De Angelis, M.D. ? Diane M. Becker, Sc.D. ? Gert H. Brieger, M.D., Ph.D. ? Leon Gordis, M.D. ? H. Franklin Herlong, M.D. ? K. Joseph Hurt ? Michael M. E. Johns, M.D. ? Langford Kidd, M.D., F.R.C.P. ? Michael J. Klag, M.D. ? Harold P. Lehmann, M.D., Ph.D. ? Nancy Ryan Lowitt, M.D., Ed.M. ? Lucy A. Mead, Sc.M. ? Thomas D. Pollard, M.D. ? Henry M. Seidel, M.D. ? John H. Shatzer Jr., Ph.D. ? Patricia A. Thomas, M.D., F.A.C.P. ? Victor Velculescu ? Charles M. Wiener, M.D.
A Practical Guide for Medical Teachers

Author: John Dent

Publisher: Elsevier Health Sciences

ISBN: 9780702068935

Category: Medical

Page: 428

View: 984

The Fifth Edition of the highly praised Practical Guide for Medical Teachers provides a bridge between the theoretical aspects of medical education and the delivery of enthusiastic and effective teaching in basic science and clinical medicine. Healthcare professionals are committed teachers and this book is an essential guide to help them maximise their performance. This highly regarded book recognises the importance of educational skills in the delivery of quality teaching in medicine. The contents offer valuable insights into all important aspects of medical education today. A leading educationalist from the USA joins the book’s editorial team. The continual emergence of new topics is recognised in this new edition with nine new chapters: The role of patients as teachers and assessors; Medical humanities; Decision-making; Alternative medicine; Global awareness; Education at a time of ubiquitous information; Programmative assessment; Student engagement; and Social accountability. An enlarged group of authors from more than 15 countries provides both an international perspective and a multi-professional approach to topics of interest to all healthcare teachers.
How To Be An Effective Supervisor: Best Practice In Research Student Supervision

Author: Eley, Adrian

Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education (UK)

ISBN: 9780335222957

Category: Education

Page: 243

View: 907

This is a practical guide aimed at supervisors of research students. It is written in a lively case study style and is designed to appeal to supervisors who need a quick fix, and who have neither the time nor the inclination to read a more detailed, in depth book on the subject such as Supervising the Doctorate. There is a growing need for such a volume as the QAA postgraduate code of practice in the UK indicates that all new doctoral supervisors must be trained appropriately. This book will be very suitable for such training courses. The authors both come from a medical background so the book is likely to be particularly well recieved within scientfic and medical departments.
Essentials of Human Resource Management

Author: Shaun Tyson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136405280

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 478

View: 925

Essentials of HRM combines a commentary on organizational behaviour with an explanation of human resource management techniques, and also acts as an introduction to industrial relations. It will prove an invaluable aid to those studying for professional qualifications, such as Membership of the Institute of Personnel Management or the Diploma in Management Studies, and for students on general business or social service courses. Equally, the practising manager will find this book a useful and practical guide.