Inuit Education and Schools in the Eastern Arctic

Author: Heather E. McGregor

Publisher: UBC Press

ISBN: 9780774859493

Category: Education

Page: 240

View: 426

Since the mid-twentieth century, sustained contact between Inuit and newcomers has led to profound changes in education in the Eastern Arctic, including the experience of colonization and progress toward the re-establishment of traditional education in schools. Heather McGregor assesses developments in the history of education in four periods � the traditional, the colonial (1945-70), the territorial (1971-81), and the local (1982-99). She concludes that education is most successful when Inuit involvement and local control support a system reflecting Inuit culture and visions.
Inuit Education and Formal Schooling in the Eastern Arctic

Author: Heather Elizabeth McGregor

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:261175461

Category: Education and state

Page: 450

View: 106

Profound changes in education accompanied sustained contact between Inuit and Qallunaat, or non-Inuit, in the 20th century. A definition of "Inuit Education" is established here, and through four periods--the Traditional, Colonial, Territorial and Local--this history will investigate: aspects of Inuit Education employed in formal schools, their purpose and success; the relationship between Inuit Education and the Qallunaat system of schooling; and exploration of who initiated and controlled educational change. During the Local Period, 1985--1999, most educational decision-making occurred at the level of district education authorities and regional school boards, focusing on the re-establishment of Inuit Education within the formal school system. These mechanisms of local control brought about a form of education widely contributed to, and supported by, Inuit. As this thesis will demonstrate, it was this approach to education that had the best capacity to reflect Inuit culture, their relationship with the environment, and their vision of the future.
Canada's Residential Schools: The Inuit and Northern Experience

Author: Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN: 9780773598225

Category: Social Science

Page: 260

View: 885

Between 1867 and 2000, the Canadian government sent over 150,000 Aboriginal children to residential schools across the country. Government officials and missionaries agreed that in order to “civilize and Christianize” Aboriginal children, it was necessary to separate them from their parents and their home communities. For children, life in these schools was lonely and alien. Discipline was harsh, and daily life was highly regimented. Aboriginal languages and cultures were denigrated and suppressed. Education and technical training too often gave way to the drudgery of doing the chores necessary to make the schools self-sustaining. Child neglect was institutionalized, and the lack of supervision created situations where students were prey to sexual and physical abusers. Legal action by the schools’ former students led to the creation of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada in 2008. The product of over six years of research, the Commission’s final report outlines the history and legacy of the schools, and charts a pathway towards reconciliation. Canada’s Residential Schools: The Inuit and Northern Experience demonstrates that residential schooling followed a unique trajectory in the North. As late as 1950 there were only six residential schools and one hostel north of the sixtieth parallel. Prior to the 1950s, the federal government left northern residential schools in the hands of the missionary societies that operated largely in the Mackenzie Valley and the Yukon. It was only in the 1950s that Inuit children began attending residential schools in large numbers. The tremendous distances that Inuit children had to travel to school meant that, in some cases, they were separated from their parents for years. The establishment of day schools and what were termed small hostels in over a dozen communities in the eastern Arctic led many Inuit parents to settle in those communities on a year-round basis so as not to be separated from their children, contributing to a dramatic transformation of the Inuit economy and way of life. Not all the northern institutions are remembered similarly. The staff at Grandin College in Fort Smith and the Churchill Vocational Centre in northern Manitoba were often cited for the positive roles that they played in developing and encouraging a new generation of Aboriginal leadership. The legacy of other schools, particularly Grollier Hall in Inuvik and Turquetil Hall in Igluligaarjuk (Chesterfield Inlet), is far darker. These schools were marked by prolonged regimes of sexual abuse and harsh discipline that scarred more than one generation of children for life. Since Aboriginal people make up a large proportion of the population in Canada’s northern territories, the impact of the schools has been felt intensely through the region. And because the history of these schools is so recent, the intergenerational impacts and the legacy of the schools are strongly felt in the North.
School Leadership in Diverse Contexts

Author: Simon Clarke

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317595922

Category: Education

Page: 210

View: 725

School Leadership in Diverse Contexts demonstrates the centrality of context to understanding school leadership. It offers varied portrayals of leadership in a diverse range of distinct settings. Each chapter highlights the prominence of context in understanding the realities of school leadership, focusing on issues and influences that school leaders face, strategies school leaders adopt to deal with the complexities of their work, and conceptualisations of school leadership relevant to the context. An impressive array of international experts examine this neglected area of research by considering school leadership in nine heterogeneous contexts, providing rich and varied portrayals of school leadership and suggesting ways in which the leadership may be enhanced. School Leadership in Diverse Contexts is an ideal book for undergraduate and postgraduate students, particularly those studying units in educational leadership, comparative education and educational policy. Similarly undergraduate and postgraduate students engaged with development studies, history, sociology, law, human geography will be attracted to this text.
Education in North America

Author: D. E. Mulcahy

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 9781472505156

Category: Education

Page: 336

View: 490

Education in North America is a concise and thorough reference guide to the main themes in American and Canadian education from their historical roots to the present time. The book brings a global awareness to the discussion of local issues in North American education and sheds light on the similar and different ways that Canada and the United States have moved in light of political and social changes. Scholarly contributions made by active researchers from the region provide an overview of each country's education system, the way in which it arose, and its current state of affairs.
Arctic Human Development Report

Author: Joan Nymand Larsen

Publisher: Nordic Council of Ministers

ISBN: 9789289338837

Category: Arctic peoples

Page: 500

View: 489

The goals of the second volume of the AHDR – Arctic Human Development Report: Regional Processes and Global Linkages – are to provide an update to the first AHDR (2004) in terms of an assessment of the state of Arctic human development; to highlight the major trends and changes unfolding related to the various issues and thematic areas of human development in the Arctic over the past decade; and, based on this assessment, to identify policy relevant conclusions and key gaps in knowledge, new and emerging Arctic success stories. The production of AHDR-II on the tenth anniversary of the first AHDR makes it possible to move beyond the baseline assessment to make valuable comparisons and contrasts across a decade of persistent and rapid change in the North. It addresses critical issues and emerging challenges in Arctic living conditions, quality of life in the North, global change impacts and adaptation, and Indigenous livelihoods. The assessment contributes to our understanding of the interplay and consequences of physical and social change processes affecting Arctic residents’ quality of life, at both the regional and global scales. It shows that the Arctic is not a homogenous region. Impacts of globalization and environmental change differ within and between regions, between Indigenous and non-Indigenous northerners, between genders and along other axes.
Global Perspectives on Microaggressions in Schools

Author: Julie K. Corkett

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000397208

Category: Education

Page: 178

View: 461

Recognizing microaggression as an often unseen, yet pervasive issue in schools globally, this book offers critical examination of instances of aggression, hostility, and incivility in school contexts around the world. Drawing on authors’ experiences and empirical analyses, the volume puts forward practical recommendations to remedy such violence and tackle its root causes. Global Perspectives on Microaggressions in Schools brings together contributions from South Africa, Australia, Canada, and the US to explore the various forms that microaggression can take. Authors implement qualitative methodologies, personal reflection, and empirical literature to document microaggressions perpetrated by, and directed against all members of the school community, including students, teachers, school leaders, and administrators. In doing so, they highlight ongoing issues including xenophobia, sexual violence, and prejudice against gifted students, LGBTQ, refugee, and indigenous communities. Looking forward, the volume proposes practical ways to undermine such prejudices and prevent the occurrence of microaggressions through effective training, policy, leadership, and student agency. Given its rigorous approach and attention to widespread issues of school violence, this book will be a timely resource for scholars, researchers, and academics with an interest in the sociology of education, educational leadership, school culture, student well-being, and inclusive education. In addition, school leaders, administrators, and pre- and in-service educators may find benefit from reading this volume.
Further Developments in the Theory and Practice of Cybercartography

Author: D.R. Fraser Taylor

Publisher: Elsevier

ISBN: 9780444642820

Category: Science

Page: 554

View: 142

Further Developments in the Theory and Practice of Cybercartography, Third Edition, Volume Nine, presents a substantively updated edition of a classic text on cybercartography, presenting new and returning readers alike with the latest advances in the field. The book examines the major elements of cybercartography and embraces an interactive, dynamic, multisensory format with the use of multimedia and multimodal interfaces. Material covering the major elements, key ideas and definitions of cybercartography is newly supplemented by several chapters on two emerging areas of study, including international dimensions and language mapping. This new edition delves deep into Mexico, Brazil, Denmark, Iran and Kyrgyzstan, demonstrating how insights emerge when cybercartography is applied in different cultural contexts. Meanwhile, other chapters contain case studies by a talented group of linguists who are breaking new ground by applying cybercartography to language mapping, a breakthrough that will provide new ways of understanding the distribution and movement of language and culture. Highlights the relationship between cybercartography and critical geography Incorporates the latest developments in the field of cybercartography, including International Dimensions and Language Mapping Showcases the legal, ethical and policy implications of mapping local and traditional knowledge
Mapping Modernisms

Author: Elizabeth Harney

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822372615

Category: Art

Page: 432

View: 844

Mapping Modernisms brings together scholars working around the world to address the modern arts produced by indigenous and colonized artists. Expanding the contours of modernity and its visual products, the contributors illustrate how these artists engaged with ideas of Primitivism through visual forms and philosophical ideas. Although often overlooked in the literature on global modernisms, artists, artworks, and art patrons moved within and across national and imperial borders, carrying, appropriating, or translating objects, images, and ideas. These itineraries made up the dense networks of modern life, contributing to the crafting of modern subjectivities and of local, transnationally inflected modernisms. Addressing the silence on indigeneity in established narratives of modernism, the contributors decenter art history's traditional Western orientation and prompt a re-evaluation of canonical understandings of twentieth-century art history. Mapping Modernisms is the first book in Modernist Exchanges, a multivolume project dedicated to rewriting the history of modernism and modernist art to include artists, theorists, art forms, and movements from around the world. Contributors. Bill Anthes, Peter Brunt, Karen Duffek, Erin Haney, Elizabeth Harney, Heather Igloliorte, Sandra Klopper, Ian McLean, Anitra Nettleton, Chika Okeke-Agulu, Ruth B. Phillips, W. Jackson Rushing III, Damian Skinner, Nicholas Thomas, Norman Vorano
Our Ice Is Vanishing / Sikuvut Nunguliqtuq

Author: Shelley Wright

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN: 9780773596115

Category: Social Science

Page: 425

View: 842

The Arctic is ruled by ice. For Inuit, it is a highway, a hunting ground, and the platform on which life is lived. While the international community argues about sovereignty, security, and resource development at the top of the world, the Inuit remind us that they are the original inhabitants of this magnificent place - and that it is undergoing a dangerous transformation. The Arctic ice is melting at an alarming rate and Inuit have become the direct witnesses and messengers of climate change. Through an examination of Inuit history and culture, alongside the experiences of newcomers to the Arctic seeking land, wealth, adventure, and power, Our Ice Is Vanishing describes the legacies of exploration, intervention, and resilience. Combining scientific and legal information with political and individual perspectives, Shelley Wright follows the history of the Canadian presence in the Arctic and shares her own journey in recollections and photographs, presenting the far North as few people have seen it. Climate change is redrawing the boundaries of what Inuit and non-Inuit have learned to expect from our world. Our Ice Is Vanishing demonstrates that we must engage with the knowledge of the Inuit in order to understand and negotiate issues of climate change and sovereignty claims in the region.
Traditions, Traps and Trends

Author: Jarich Oosten

Publisher: University of Alberta

ISBN: 9781772124026

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 232

The transfer of knowledge is a key issue in the North as Indigenous peoples meet the ongoing need to adapt to cultural and environmental change. In eight essays, experts survey critical issues surrounding the knowledge practices of the Inuit of northern Canada and Greenland and the Northern Sámi of Scandinavia, and the difficulties of transferring that knowledge from one generation to the next. Reflecting the ongoing work of the Research Group Circumpolar Cultures, these multidisciplinary essays offer fresh understandings through history and across geography as scholars analyze cultural, ecological, and political aspects of peoples in transition. Traditions, Traps and Trends is an important book for students and scholars in anthropology and ethnography and for everyone interested in the Circumpolar North. Contributors: Cunera Buijs, Frédéric Laugrand, Barbara Helen Miller, Thea Olsthoorn, Jarich Oosten, Willem Rasing, Kim van Dam, Nellejet Zorgdrager
International Education as Public Policy in Canada

Author: Merli Tamtik

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN: 9780228003106

Category: Political Science

Page:

View: 563

In the early twenty-first century international education emerged as an almost ubiquitous concept within discussions of educational curriculum; the objectives of schools, universities, and colleges; and government policies for K–12 and higher education. Although far from a new phenomenon, many jurisdictions now view international education as a highly competitive global industry. This book provides a comprehensive analysis of international education policy in Canada, tracing the complex history of when, how, and why it emerged as a policy area of strategic importance. Illuminating a uniquely Canadian perspective, influenced by regional interests and federal-provincial tensions, International Education as Public Policy in Canada addresses challenging questions: Why was Canada a latecomer in addressing this policy issue? What is the relationship between international education and Canadian immigration policy? How did international education develop as a major Canadian industry? The resulting essays from leading scholars contribute not only to the growing Canadian literature on international education policy but also to a critical, global conversation. Contemplating where the Canadian story of international education is headed, International Education as Public Policy in Canada calls for a broader debate on ethical practices in internationalization, focusing on inclusion, equity, compassion, and reciprocity.