Looking Back and Living Forward

Author: Jennifer Markides

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004367418

Category: Education

Page: 318

View: 538

Looking Back and Living Forward: Indigenous Research Rising Up shares the research of a diverse group of scholars from a variety of disciplines, addressing historical legacies and present issues in the contexts of Indigenous: resistance, revitalization, reconciliation, relationality, and resurgence.
Indigenous Courts, Self-Determination and Criminal Justice

Author: Valmaine Toki

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351239608

Category: Law

Page: 290

View: 769

In New Zealand, as well as in Australia, Canada and other comparable jurisdictions, Indigenous peoples comprise a significantly disproportionate percentage of the prison population. For example, Maori, who comprise 15% of New Zealand’s population, make up 50% of its prisoners. For Maori women, the figure is 60%. These statistics have, moreover, remained more or less the same for at least the past thirty years. With New Zealand as its focus, this book explores how the fact that Indigenous peoples are more likely than any other ethnic group to be apprehended, arrested, prosecuted, convicted and incarcerated, might be alleviated. Taking seriously the rights to culture and to self-determination contained in the Treaty of Waitangi, in many comparable jurisdictions (including Australia, Canada, the United States of America), and also in the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, the book make the case for an Indigenous court founded on Indigenous conceptions of proper conduct, punishment, and behavior. More specifically, the book draws on contemporary notions of ‘therapeutic jurisprudence’ and ‘restorative justice’ in order to argue that such a court would offer an effective way to ameliorate the disproportionate incarceration of Indigenous peoples.
The Ethic of Traditional Communities and the Spirit of Healing Justice

Author: Jarem Sawatsky

Publisher: Jessica Kingsley Publishers

ISBN: 9781846428913

Category: Political Science

Page: 288

View: 594

What is healing justice? Who practices it? What does it look like? In this groundbreaking international comparative study on healing justice, Jarem Sawatsky examines traditional communities including Hollow Water - an Aboriginal and Métis community in Canada renowned for their holistic healing work in the face of 80 per cent sexual abuse rates; the Iona Community - a dispersed Christian ecumenical community in Scotland known for their work towards peace, healing and social justice, rebuilding of community and the renewal of worship; and Plum Village - a Vietnamese initiated Buddhist community in southern France, and home to Nobel Peace Prize nominated author, Thich Nhat Hanh. These case studies record a search for the kind of social, structural, and spiritual relationships necessary to sustain a healing view of justice. Through comparing cases, Sawatsky identifies the common patterns, themes, and imagination which these communities share. These commonalities among those that practice healing justice are then examined for their implications for wider society, particularly for restorative justice and criminal justice. This innovative book is accessible to those new to the topic, while at the same time being beneficial to experienced researchers, and will appeal internationally to practitioners, students, and anyone interested in restorative justice, law, peace building, and religious studies.
Creating the Third Force

Author: Hamdesa Tuso

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 9780739185292

Category: Political Science

Page: 586

View: 130

This book uses case studies from around the world to analyze the peacemaking processes of indigenous communities. Critical themes examined in the volume include change and continuity, the role of indigenous women, tools of peacemakers, common features of peacemaking processes, and the over-arching goals of peacemaking.
Aboriginal Justice and the Charter

Author: David Milward

Publisher: UBC Press

ISBN: 9780774824583

Category: Social Science

Page: 332

View: 869

Aboriginal Justice and the Charter examines and seeks to resolve the tension between Aboriginal approaches to justice and the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Until now, scholars have explored idealized notions of what Aboriginal justice might look like. David Milward strikes out into new territory by asking why Aboriginal communities seek reform and by identifying some of the constitutional barriers in their path. He identifies specific areas of the criminal justice process in which Aboriginal communities may wish to adopt different approaches, tests these approaches against constitutional imperatives, and offers practical proposals for reconciling the various matters at stake. This bold exploration of Aboriginal justice grapples with the difficult question of how Aboriginal justice systems can be fair to their constituents but still comply with the protections guaranteed to all Canadians by the Charter.
Handbook of Critical and Indigenous Methodologies

Author: Norman K. Denzin

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 9781412918039

Category: Social Science

Page: 604

View: 928

The Handbook of Critical Methodologies covers everything from the history of critical and indigenous theory and how it came to inform and impact qualitative research and indigenous peoples to the critical constructs themselves, including race/diversity, gender representation (queer theory, feminism), culture, and politics to the meaning of "critical" concepts within specific disciplines (critical psychology, critical communication/mass communication, media studies, cultural studies, political economy, education, sociology, anthropology, history, etc. - all in an effort to define emancipatory research and explore what critical qualitative research can do for social change and social justice.
Justpeace Ethics

Author: Jarem Sawatsky

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781556352997

Category: Religion

Page: 114

View: 827

People too often enter into conflict with an eye on how to resolve, manage, or transform it, thereby losing sight of the people involved and the end desired. Justice and peace too often serve as abstract ideals or distant shores. We have not yet learned enough about how these ends can also be the means of conflict resolution. Drawing on the imaginations of some leading peace and restorative justice practitioners, Justpeace Ethics identifies components of a justpeace imagination--the basis of an alternative ethics, where the end is touched with each step. In this simple companion to justpeace ethics, Jarem Sawatsky helps those struggling with how to respond to conflict and violence in both just and peaceful ways. He offers practical examples of how analysis, intervention, and evaluation can be rooted in a justpeace imagination.
Qualitative Inquiry and Human Rights

Author: Norman K Denzin

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781315421551

Category: Psychology

Page: 288

View: 734

Qualitative researchers are increasingly being called upon to become human rights advocates, to help individuals and communities honor the sanctity of life, and to promote the core values of privacy, justice, freedom, peace, and human dignity. In this volume of plenary papers from the Fifth International of Qualitative Inquiry in 2009, leading qualitative researchers show the various dimensions of the human rights work being done by scholar/activists in the social sciences, education, health care, social services, cultural studies, and other fields.
American Indian Culture: From Counting Coup to Wampum [2 volumes]

Author: Bruce E. Johansen

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 9781440828744

Category: Social Science

Page: 770

View: 730

This invaluable resource provides a comprehensive historical and demographic overview of American Indians along with more than 100 cross-referenced entries on American Indian culture, exploring everything from arts, literature, music, and dance to food, family, housing, and spirituality. American Indian Culture: From Counting Coup to Wampum is organized by cultural form (Arts; Family, Education, and Community; Food; Language and Literature; Media and Popular Culture; Music and Dance; Spirituality; and Transportation and Housing). Examples of topics covered include icons of Native culture, such as pow wows, Indian dancing, and tipi dwellings; Native art forms such as pottery, rock art, sandpainting, silverwork, tattooing, and totem poles; foods such as corn, frybread, and wild rice; and Native Americans in popular culture. The extensive introductory section, breadth of topics, accessibly written text, and range of perspectives from the many contributors make this work a must-have resource for high school and undergraduate audiences. • Serves to document how many attributes of Native cultures derive from a rich tapestry of American Indian cultural forms, such as very well-known foods like corn, potatoes, turkey, peanuts, and chocolate • Includes numerous spotlights that highlight interesting topics such as the Indigenous Language Institute, the kiva, counting coup, buffalo hunt customs and protocols, and Dakota language in rap music • Offers further readings and additional sources with the entries to guide students or interested readers in their research
Reconciliation and Indigenous Justice

Author: David Milward

Publisher: Fernwood Publishing

ISBN: 9781773635408

Category: Social Science

Page: 233

View: 814

The horrors of the Indian residential schools are by now well-known historical facts, and they have certainly found purchase in the Canadian consciousness in recent years. The history of violence and the struggles of survivors for redress resulted in the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, which chronicled the harms inflicted by the residential schools and explored ways to address the resulting social fallouts. One of those fallouts is the crisis of Indigenous over-incarceration. While the residential school system may not be the only harmful process of colonization that fuels Indigenous over-incarceration, it is arguably the most critical factor. It is likely that the residential school system forms an important part of the background of almost every Indigenous person who ends up incarcerated, even those who did not attend the schools. The legacy of harm caused by the schools is a vivid and crucial link between Canadian colonialism and Indigenous over-incarceration. Reconciliation and Indigenous Justice provides an account of the ongoing ties between the enduring trauma caused by the residential schools and Indigenous over-incarceration.