The London, Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science, Vol. 17

Author: David Brewster

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN: 1330660013

Category: Science

Page: 568

View: 431

Excerpt from The London, Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science, Vol. 17: New and United Series of the Philosophical Magazine, Annals of Philosophy, and Journal of Science; July December, 1840 If coal gas be made to pass slowly and for a length of time over pure iodine, the latter substance moistens, and is partly changed into a dark-brown liquid, which effervesces with alkaline carbonates, showing the presence of hydriodic acid. After some hours, colourless prismatic crystals shoot out from the iodine, and clothe the interior of the vessel, and ultimately the whole is changed into a mixture of different compounds forming an olive-coloured substance, partly coating thickly the sides of the vessel, and partly constituting an unctuous mass, with the dark fluid at the bottom. The liquid contains free iodine and hydriodic acid. When washed out from the solid portion by alcohol and neutralized by caustic potash, the solution gives a yellow precipitate, consisting of a mixture of Faraday's iodide of carbo-hydrogen (H4 Cj I)f and of iodide of formyle (iodoform H C I3). The solid product being exposed to the air loses its unctuosity. If broken up and examined by the microscope it is seen to consist of a congeries of colourless prisms (Ha Ca I) mixed with another substance, which is amorphous, and of a dark green almost black colour. Alcohol separates the former, or if the mixture be exposed to the air they volatilize, leaving the dark green substance nearly pure. The production of the hydriodic acid and of the iodides of formyl and of carbo-hydrogen is easily understood. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works."
The London, Edinburgh, and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science, Vol. 37

Author: David Brewster

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN: 1334257965

Category:

Page: 574

View: 448

Excerpt from The London, Edinburgh, and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science, Vol. 37: New and United Series of the Philosophical Magazine, Annals of Philosophy, and Journal of Science; July-December, 1850 Mr. R. L. Ellis's Remarks on an alleged proof of the Method of Least Squares, contained in a late Number of the Edinburgh Review. In a Letter addressed to Professor J. D. Forbes. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.
The London, Edinburgh, and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science, Vol. 32

Author: David Brewster

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN: 036551019X

Category: Science

Page: 574

View: 984

Excerpt from The London, Edinburgh, and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science, Vol. 32: New and United Series of the Philosophical Magazine, Annals of Philosophy, and Journal of Science; January-June, 1848 If we mark Individual filaments, or groups, or knots, we shall find that they change their shapes, one part Ofa filament doubling itself over another, and again resuming its elongated form. The minute spherical bodies separate and approach one another; but I have not been able to satisfy myself that those within the tubular filaments change their place. They Often appear to do so; but as this necessarily arises from the bending of the filament, and from the var ing obliquity of different parts of it owing to its change of orm or place, we are not entitled, from this apparent motion, to consider them as moveable within the tube. It is certain, however, that they have no progressive motion, as supposed by Mr. Mackenzie. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.
London, Edinburgh, and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal Of. Science, Vol. 30

Author: David Brewster

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN: 028262662X

Category: Science

Page: 1124

View: 717

Excerpt from London, Edinburgh, and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal Of. Science, Vol. 30: New and United Series of the Philosophical Magazine, Annals of Philosophy, and Journal of Science; January-June, 1847 A similar correction may be a plied without difficulty to the other equations discussed by e author of the paper in question. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.
The London, Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science, Vol. 33

Author: David Brewster

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN: 1330747542

Category: Science

Page: 584

View: 929

Excerpt from The London, Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science, Vol. 33: New and United of the Philosophical Magazine, Annals of Philosophy, and Journal of Science; July December, 1848 It is lain from the result of these analyses, that anhydrous orcine as lost three atoms of water, and that its probable formula is C9, HR 06, that Of hydrated orcine being Cs Hmos. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.
The London, Edinburgh, and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science, Vol. 26

Author: Professor of Philosophy Robert Kane

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN: 0266445160

Category: Science

Page: 576

View: 720

Excerpt from The London, Edinburgh, and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science, Vol. 26: Fifth Series; July-December, 1888 A continued occupation with the optical properties of very thin metallic films induced me to investigate whether it would not be possible to prepare metallic prisms of very small angle and sufficiently transparent to permit of determining the prismatic deviation produced, and so arrive at a knowledge of the velocity of light in the most direct way possible. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.
The London, Edinburgh, and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science, Vol. 45

Author: Professor of Philosophy Robert Kane

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN: 0483587702

Category: Science

Page: 798

View: 802

Excerpt from The London, Edinburgh, and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science, Vol. 45: Fourth Series; January-June, 1873 It only remawa to give the simplest formula for deterrmmng the temperature of the furnace m terms of the observed dis placement of the resonator-serratlons, and of the known number of wave-lengths m the furnace-tube at the temperature t. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.
The London, Edinburgh, and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science, Vol. 6

Author: PROFESSOR OF PHILOSOPHY ROBERT. KANE

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN: 1334258058

Category: Science

Page: 506

View: 747

Excerpt from The London, Edinburgh, and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science, Vol. 6: July-December, 1878 The question of the origin of nebula is simplified by the theory, now generally received, that stars are suns like our own, and that nebula are in all probability stars in process of formation. The problem will therefore be most readily attacked by considering, first, the origin of our sun, as this orb, being the one most accessible to us, is that with which we are best acquainted. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.
The London, Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science, Vol. 5

Author: David Brewster

Publisher:

ISBN: 1332508553

Category: Science

Page: 592

View: 913

Excerpt from The London, Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science, Vol. 5: January June, 1853 About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.
The London, Edinburgh, and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science, Vol. 32

Author: David Brewster

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN: 048471788X

Category: Science

Page: 608

View: 921

Excerpt from The London, Edinburgh, and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science, Vol. 32: Fourth Series; July-December, 1866 AS to the physical meaning of the magnitude S, I have already discussed it in my paper, above referred to, On the Application of the Principle of the Equivalence of Transformations to Internal Work we have, however, no need to enter upon these cousi derations here, and I have referred to them merely because I have derived from them the name of the magnitude S. I have formed, namely, from the Greek word mom), change, the word entropy, which expresses the meaning of the magnitude S, in the same way as the word energy denotes that of the magnitude U. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.