Modern Materialism and Emergent Evolution

Author: William McDougall

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317275091

Category: Psychology

Page: 310

View: 985

Originally published in 1929, McDougall examines the pertinent conflict between religion and science. His work exhibits the failure of scientists to explain human action mechanistically (the essence of modern materialism), establishes purposive action as a type of event radically different from all mechanistic events, and justifies the belief in teleological causation without which there can be neither religion nor morals. This title will be of interest to students of both the Humanities and Sciences, particularly those studying psychology and philosophy.
Modern Materialism and Emergent Evolution

Author: William 1871-1938 N 5000 McDougall

Publisher: Hassell Street Press

ISBN: 1014059313

Category:

Page: 324

View: 949

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. To ensure a quality reading experience, this work has been proofread and republished using a format that seamlessly blends the original graphical elements with text in an easy-to-read typeface. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.
Emergent Evolution

Author: David Blitz

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9789401580427

Category: Science

Page: 241

View: 396

Emergent evolution combines three separate but related claims, whose background, origin, and development I trace in this work: firstly, that evolution is a universal process of change, one which is productive of qualitative novelties; secondly, that qualitative novelty is the emergence in a system of a property not possessed by any of its parts; and thirdly, that reality can be analyzed into levels, each consisting of systems characterized by significant emergent properties. In part one I consider the background to emergence in the 19th century discussion of the philosophy of evolution among its leading exponents in England - Charles Darwin, Herbert Spencer, T. H. Huxley, Alfred Russel Wallace, and G. J. Romanes. Unlike the scientific aspect of the debate which aimed to determine the factors and causal mechanism of biological evolution, this aspect of the debate centered on more general problems which form what I call the "philosophical framework for evolutionary theory." This considers the status of continuity and discontinuity in evolution, the role of qualitative and quantitative factors in change, the relation between the organic and the inorganic, the relation between the natural and the supernatural, the mind-body problem, and the scope of evolution, including its extension to ethics and morals.
Modern Thomistic Philosophy

Author: R. P. Phillips

Publisher: BoD – Books on Demand

ISBN: 9783868385397

Category: Philosophy

Page: 362

View: 770

The first volume of this introduction in Thomistic philosophy includes as part 1 Cosmology as the philosophy of inanimate nature and as part 2 the philosophy of animate nature that is philosophical psychology. “Dr. Phillips is to be congratulated on the clear and lucid way he has set forth Thomist doctrines and especially for the manner in which he has rendered the Latin terminology of Schoolman in English, an achievement which makes his book very readable and interesting even for those unacquainted with the great treatises of Schoolman.” L.J. Walker, in Philosophy, Vol. 11, Issue 43.
Platonism and Positivism in Psychology

Author: Julie Christian

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351308380

Category: Psychology

Page: 273

View: 198

Psychology is a field of many paradoxes. Since its earliest beginnings as a natural science, psychologists have been in search of their proper subject matter. Today they are in less agreement than ever. In this classic text, originally published as What Man Has Made of Man, Mortimer J. Adler goes to the root of the problem. He shows that psychology is simultaneously a particular social science and a branch of philosophical knowledge. These two parts must be distinguished from, yet related to, each other if sound philosophical analysis is to replace bad "philosophizing," which scientific psychologists too often use to describe their research findings. Adler also examines the scientific contribution of psychoanalysis by distinguishing it from Freud's meta-psychology, which he shows to be an inadequate statement of the traditional or classical philosophical positions. Adler believes that psychology is crucially important in modern culture. It is theoretically important because it is central to the errors of modern philosophy. It has practical significance because economic, moral, and political doctrines are determined by the view that man reviews his own nature. To understand the history of modern times, and to correct its normative deviations, we must, according to Adler, consider what man has made of man. This engaging analytical study will be a valuable tool for psychologists, psychoanalysts, philosophers, and sociologists.
The Problem of Disenchantment

Author: Egil Asprem

Publisher: State University of New York Press

ISBN: 9781438469942

Category: Religion

Page: 662

View: 828

Challenges the conventional view of a “disenchanted” and secular modernity, and recovers the complex relation that exists between science, religion, and esotericism in the modern world. Max Weber famously characterized the ongoing process of intellectualization and rationalization that separates the natural world from the divine (by excluding magic and value from the realm of science, and reason and fact from the realm of religion) as the “disenchantment of the world.” Egil Asprem argues for a conceptual shift in how we view this key narrative of modernity. Instead of a sociohistorical process of disenchantment that produces increasingly rational minds, Asprem maintains that the continued presence of “magic” and “enchantment” in people’s everyday experience of the world created an intellectual problem for those few who were socialized to believe that nature should contain no such incalculable mysteries. Drawing on a wide range of early twentieth-century primary sources from theoretical physics, occultism, embryology, radioactivity, psychical research, and other fields, Asprem casts the intellectual life of high modernity as a synchronic struggle across conspicuously different fields that shared surprisingly similar intellectual problems about value, meaning, and the limits of knowledge. Egil Asprem is Associate Professor of History of Religions at the Department of Ethnology, History of Religions, and Gender Studies, Stockholm University, and the author of Arguing with Angels: Enochian Magic and Modern Occulture, also published by SUNY Press.
Materialist Ethics and Life-Value

Author: Jeff Noonan

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN: 9780773588103

Category: Philosophy

Page: 256

View: 840

Current patterns of global economic activity are not only unsustainable, but unethical - this claim is central to Materialist Ethics and Life-Value. Grounding the definition of ethical value in the natural and social requirements of life-support and life-development shared by all human beings, Jeff Noonan provides a new way of understanding the universal conception of "the good life." Noonan argues that the true crisis affecting the world today is not sluggish rates of economic growth but the model of measuring economic and social health in terms of money-value. In response, he develops an alternative understanding of good societies where the breadth and depth of life-activity and enjoyment are dependent on dominant institutions. The more social institutions satisfy the necessary requirements of human life, the more they empower each person to develop and enjoy the capacities that make human life valuable and meaningful. A well-reasoned synthesis of traditional philosophical concerns and contemporary critiques of global capitalism, this book is a forward-looking treatise that defends political struggle and reconsiders what is most important for a happy life.
An Introduction to Social Psychology

Author: William McDougall

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9781317530404

Category: Psychology

Page: 556

View: 869

On its first publication in 1908 this pioneer book received immediate acclaim and was thought to have probably done more than any other single publication to stimulate study of the foundations of social behaviour. Professor McDougall was the most powerful advocate of an idealistic outlook on human life and activity, and his ideas continued to attract attention even when published in paperback form in 1960.
Psychology Library Editions: Social Psychology

Author: Various

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9781317439936

Category: Psychology

Page: 9591

View: 515

Psychology Library Editions: Social Psychology (30-volume set) brings together an eclectic mix of titles from a wealth of authors with diverse backgrounds, seeking to understand human behaviour and interaction from a socio-psychological perspective. The series of previously out-of-print titles, originally published between 1908 and 1993, includes those from some authors considered to be founders of social psychology and traces the development of the subject from its early foundations.