Myth and the Irish State

Author: John M. Regan

Publisher:

ISBN: 0716532123

Category: Ireland

Page: 296

View: 451

When we read a history, we believe ourselves to be reading cold hard facts about the events that took place and how they occurred. Yet, there is no real truthful way to know the approach that the historian has taken with the historical sources. This book deals with the uncertainty in writing history, in the context of Irish history in particular. Author John M. Regan argues that the notion of elision - simply ignoring unhelpful evidence - threatens Irish history today. Regan believes that some historians have ignored unhelpful facts that perhaps do not further their point, or perhaps contradict them altogether. Each chapter of the book focuses on a period of Irish history that Regan believes to be inconsistent or incomplete in its facts. He asks the controversial questions about the period of history, such as: Why do some historians deny or marginalize the British threat of war and re-conquest in 1922? Why do so many Irish historians describe Michael Collins as a 'constitutionalist' or a 'democrat' when the evidence argues otherwise? Was the Irish Civil War really fought between 'democrats' defending the state against 'dictators' attempting its overthrow? Did the new state briefly experience a military-dictatorship under Collins in 1922? 'Thinking historically' is not about learning history or accepting the past as it is presented to us. It is, as Regan argues in this thought-provoking book, about developing the critical skills to interpret history for ourselves. As commemorations approach, this is a timely and provocative debate, discussing the uses and abuses of public history and the role of the historian in interpreting controversial histories.
Myth and the Irish State

Author: John M. Regan

Publisher: Irish Academic Press

ISBN: 9780716532545

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 841

When we read a history we believe ourselves to be reading cold, hard, facts of the events that took place and how they occurred. But there is no real, truthful way to know the approach our historian has taken with the historical sources. This book deals with the uncertainty in writing history in the context of Irish history in particular. Regan argues in this book that the notion of elision, simply ignoring unhelpful evidence, threatens Irish history today. Regan believes that some historians have ignored unhelpful facts that perhaps do not further their point or perhaps contradict them altogether. Each chapter focuses on a period of Irish history that Regan believes to be inconsistent or incomplete in its facts. He asks the controversial questions about the period of history such as why do some historians deny or marginalise the British threat of war and re-conquest in 1922?, why do so many Irish historians describe Michael Collins as a constitutionalist or a democrat when the evidence argues otherwise? Was the Irish Civil War really fought between democrats defending the state, against dictators attempting its overthrow? Did the new state briefly experience a military-dictatorship under Collins in 1922? Thinking historically is not about learning history or accepting the past as it is presented to us it is, as Regan argues in his thought-provoking work, about developing the critical skills to interpret history for ourselves.
The Celtic Tiger

Author: Kieran Allen

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 0719058481

Category: Social Science

Page: 228

View: 189

This critical look at the Celtic tiger challenges many myths about Ireland's success story and brings its class divisions into sharp focus.
Postnationalist Ireland

Author: Richard Kearney

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 0415115027

Category: Philosophy

Page: 280

View: 917

In Postnationalist Ireland, Richard Kearney challenges received ideas regarding sovereignty and the nation-state, in an attempt to rethink definitions of Ireland.
The Northern Ireland Question

Author: Patrick John Roche

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781783240005

Category: History

Page: 292

View: 298

Barton and Roche have drawn on the expertise of scholars in Irish history, political philosophy, sociology, demography and criminal and constitutional law to provide a major contribution to understanding the dynamics of the terrorist conflict that engulfed Northern Ireland for thirty years. The legal dimension of the book provides accessible understanding both of the use of the criminal law in response to terrorism and of the constitutional status of Northern Ireland prior to the 1998 Belfast Agreement. The Northern Ireland Question: Myth and Reality explicates the civic character of unionism which differentiates unionism as a form of political identity from the ethnicity of traditional Irish nationalism. The contributions explore the ambiguities of southern Irish politics with respect to 'the Northern Ireland question' and challenge a conventional and widely accepted understanding (inimical to unionism and unionists) of the genesis of the terrorist conflict in Northern Ireland and the extent of discrimination under the Stormont administration but without loss of objectivity and professional detachment.
The Myth of an Irish Cinema

Author: Michael Patrick Gillespie

Publisher: Syracuse University Press

ISBN: 0815631685

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 308

View: 981

For the past seventy years the discipline of film studies has widely invoked the term national cinema. Such a concept suggests a unified identity with distinct cultural narratives. As the current debate over the meaning of nation and nationalism has made thoughtful readers question the term, its application to the field of film studies has become the subject of recent interrogation. In The Myth of an Irish Cinema, Michael Patrick Gillespie presents a groundbreaking challenge to the traditional view of filmmaking, contesting the existence of an Irish national cinema. Given the social, economic, and cultural complexity of contemporary Irish identity, Gillespie argues, filmmakers can no longer present Irishness as a monolithic entity. The book is arranged thematically, with chapters exploring cinematic representation of the middle class, urban life, rural life, religion, and politics. Offering close readings of Irish-themed films, Gillespie identifies a variety of interpretative approaches based on the diverse elements that define national character. Covering a wide range of films, from John Ford’s The Quiet Man and Kirk Jones’s Waking Ned Devine to Bob Quinn’s controversial Budawanny and The Bishop’s Story, The Myth of an Irish Cinema signals a paradigm shift in the field of film studies and promises to reinvigorate dialogue on the subject of national cinema.
Performing Memories

Author: Gabriele Biotti

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 9781527568921

Category: Art

Page: 439

View: 308

What is memory today? How can it be approached? Why does the contemporary world seem to be more and more haunted by different types of memories still asking for elaboration? Which artistic experiences have explored and defined memory in meaningful ways? How do technologies and the media have changed it? These are just some of the questions developed in this collection of essays analysing memory and memory shapes, which explores the different ways in which past time and its elaboration have been, and still are, elaborated, discussed, written or filmed, and contested, but also shared. By gathering together scholars from different fields of investigation, this book explores the cultural, social and artistic tensions in representing the past and the present, in understanding our legacies, and in approaching historical time and experience. Through the analysis of different representations of memory, and the investigation of literature, anthropology, myth and storytelling, a space of theories and discourses about the symbolic and cultural spaces of memory representation is developed.
The Jews, the Holocaust, and the Public

Author: Larissa Allwork

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030286750

Category: History

Page: 365

View: 910

This book explores the work and legacy of Professor David Cesarani OBE, a leading British scholar and expert on Jewish history who helped to shape Holocaust research, remembrance and education in the UK. It is a unique combination of chapters produced by researchers, curators and commemoration activists who either worked with and/or were taught by the late Cesarani. The chapters in this collection consider the legacies of Cesarani’s contribution to the discipline of history and the practice of public history. The contributors offer reflections on Cesarani’s approach and provide new insights into the study of Anglo-Jewish history, immigrants and minorities and the history and public legacies of the Holocaust.
Myths and Legends of the Celts

Author: James MacKillop

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 9780141941394

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 432

View: 814

Myths and Legends of the Celts is a fascinating and wide-ranging introduction to the mythology of the peoples who inhabited the northwestern fringes of Europe - from Britain and the Isle of Man to Gaul and Brittany. Drawing on recent historical and archaeological research, as well as literary and oral sources, the guide looks at the gods and goddesses of Celtic myth; at the nature of Celtic religion, with its rituals of sun and moon worship; and at the druids who served society as judges, diviners and philosophers. It also examines the many Celtic deities who were linked with animals and such natural phenomena as rivers and caves, or who later became associated with local Christian saints. And it explores in detail the rich variety of Celtic myths: from early legends of King Arthur to the stories of the Welsh Mabinogi, and from tales of heroes including Cúchulainn, Fionn mac Cumhaill and the warrior queen Medb to tales of shadowy otherworlds - the homes of spirits and fairies. What emerges is a wonderfully diverse and fertile tradition of myth making that has captured the imagination of countless generations, introduced and explained here with compelling insight.
Combatants and Civilians in Revolutionary Ireland, 1918-1923

Author: Thomas Earls FitzGerald

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000370461

Category: History

Page: 286

View: 667

This book is based on original research into intimidation and violence directed at civilians by combatants during the revolutionary period in Ireland, considering this from the perspectives of the British, the Free State and the IRA. The book combines qualitative and quantitative approaches, and focusses on County Kerry, which saw high levels of violence. It demonstrates that violence and intimidation against civilians was more common than clashes between combatants and that the upsurge in violence in 1920 was a result of the deployment of the Black and Tans and Auxiliaries, particularly in the autumn and winter of that year. Despite the limited threat posed by the IRA, the British forces engaged in unprecedented and unprovoked violence against civilians. This study stresses the increasing brutality of the subsequent violence by both sides. The book shows how the British had similar methods and views as contemporary counter-revolutionary groups in Europe. IRA violence, however, was, in part, an attempt to impose homogeneity as, beneath the Irish republican narrative of popular approval, there lay a recognition that universal backing was never in fact present. The book is important reading for students and scholars of the Irish revolution, the social history of Ireland and inter-war European violence.
The Cambridge History of Ireland: Volume 4, 1880 to the Present

Author: Thomas Bartlett

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108605823

Category: History

Page: 1010

View: 984

This final volume in the Cambridge History of Ireland covers the period from the 1880s to the present. Based on the most recent and innovative scholarship and research, the many contributions from experts in their field offer detailed and fresh perspectives on key areas of Irish social, economic, religious, political, demographic, institutional and cultural history. By situating the Irish story, or stories - as for much of these decades two Irelands are in play - in a variety of contexts, Irish and Anglo-Irish, but also European, Atlantic and, latterly, global. The result is an insightful interpretation on the emergence and development of Ireland during these often turbulent decades. Copiously illustrated, with special features on images of the 'Troubles' and on Irish art and sculpture in the twentieth century, this volume will undoubtedly be hailed as a landmark publication by the most recent generation of historians of Ireland.