Participatory Culture

Author: Henry Jenkins

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781509538478

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 165

Since 2006, Henry Jenkins's Confessions of an Aca-Fan blog has hosted interviews in which academics, activists, and artists have shared their views on the changing media landscape. For the first time, Jenkins – often called “the Marshall McLuhan for the twenty-first century” – compiles some of these interviews to highlight his recurring interests in popular culture and social change. Structured around three core concepts – culture, learning, politics – and designed as a companion to Participatory Culture in a Networked Era, this book broadens the conversation to incorporate diverse thinkers such as David Gauntlett, Ethan Zuckerman, Sonia Livingstone, S. Craig Watkins, James Paul Gee, Antero Garcia, Stephen Duncombe, Cathy J. Cohen, Lina Srivastava, Jonathan McIntosh, and William Uricchio. With an introduction from Jenkins and reflections from each interviewee, this volume speaks to a sense of crisis as contemporary culture has failed to fully achieve the democratic potentials once anticipated as a consequence of the participatory turn. This book is ideal for students and scholars of digital media, popular culture, education, and politics, as well as general readers with an interest in the topic.
Reading in a Participatory Culture

Author: Henry Jenkins

Publisher: Teachers College Press

ISBN: 9780807771259

Category: Education

Page: 221

View: 528

Building on the groundbreaking research of the MacArthur Foundation's Digital Media and Learning initiative, this book crosses the divide between digital literacies and traditional print culture to engage a generation of students who can read with a book in one hand and a mouse in the other. Reading in a Participatory Culture tells the story of an innovative experiment that brought together playwright and director Ricardo Pitts-Wiley, Melville scholar Wyn Kelley, and new media scholar Henry Jenkins to develop an exciting new curriculum to reshape the middle- and high-school English language arts classroom. This book offers highlights from the resources developed for teaching Herman Melvilles Moby-Dick and outlines basic principles of design, implementation, and assessment that can be applied to any text.
TransCoding - From `Highbrow Art' to Participatory Culture

Author: Barbara Lüneburg

Publisher: transcript Verlag

ISBN: 9783839441084

Category: Social Science

Page: 202

View: 189

Between 2014 and 2017, the artistic research project "TransCoding - From 'Highbrow Art' to Participatory Culture" encouraged creative participation in multimedia art via social media. Based on the artworks that emerged from the project, Barbara Lüneburg investigates authorship, authority, motivational factors, and aesthetics in participatory art created with the help of web 2.0 technology. The interdisciplinary approach includes perspectives from sociology, cultural and media studies, and offers an exclusive view and analysis from the inside through the method of artistic research. In addition, the study documents selected community projects and the creation processes of the artworks Slices of Life and Read me.
Participatory Culture and the Social Value of an Architectural Icon: Sydney Opera House

Author: Cristina Garduno Freeman

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317083856

Category: Architecture

Page: 222

View: 923

This book develops new and innovative methods for understanding the cultural significance of places such as the World Heritage listed Sydney Opera House. By connecting participatory media, visual culture and social value, Cristina Garduño Freeman contributes to a fast-growing body of scholarship on digital heritage and the popular reception of architecture. In this, her first book, she opens up a fresh perspective on heritage, as well as the ways in which people relate to architecture via participation on social media. Social media sites such as YouTube, Pinterest, Wikipedia, Facebook and Flickr, as well as others, become places for people to express their connections with places, for example, the Sydney Opera House. Garduño Freeman analyses real-world examples, from souvenirs to opera-house-shaped cakes, and untangles the tangible and intangible ways in which the significance of heritage is created, disseminated and maintained. As people’s encounters with World Heritage become increasingly mediated by the digital sphere there is a growing imperative for academics, professionals and policy-makers to understand the social value of significant places. This book is beneficial to academics, students and professionals of architecture.
Public Relations and Participatory Culture

Author: Amber Hutchins

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317659730

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 266

View: 274

While public relations practitioners have long focused on the relationship between organizations and their stakeholders, there has never been a time when that relationship was so dominated by public participation. The new model of multiple messages originating from multiple publics at varying levels of engagement is widely acknowledged, but not widely explored in scholarly texts. The established model of one-way communication and message control no longer exists. Social media and an increasingly participatory culture means that fans are taking a more active role in the production and co-creation of messages, communication, and meaning. These fans have significant power in the relationship dynamic between the message, the communicator, and the larger audience, yet they have not been defined using current theory and discourse. Our existing conceptions fail to identify these active and engaged publics, let alone understand virtual communities who are highly motivated to communicate with organizations and brands. This innovative and original research collection attempts to address this deficit by exploring these interactive, engaged publics, and open up the complexities of establishing and maintaining relationships in fan-created communities.
Digital Participatory Culture and the TV Audience

Author: Sandra M. Falero

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137500007

Category: Social Science

Page: 191

View: 771

In this study, Falero explores how online communities of participatory audiences have helped to re-define authorship and audience in the digital age. Using over a decade of ethnographic research, Digital Participatory Culture and the TV Audience explores the rise and fall of a site that some heralded as ground zero for the democratization of television criticism. Television Without Pity was a web community devoted to criticizing television programs. Their mission was to hold television networks and writers accountable by critiquing their work and “not just passively sitting around watching.” When executive producer Aaron Sorkin entered Television Without Pity’s message boards on The West Wing in late 2001, he was surprised to find the discussion populated by critics rather than fans. His anger over the criticism he found there wound up becoming a storyline in a subsequent episode of The West Wing wherein web critics were described as “obese shut-ins who lounge around in muumuus and chain-smoke Parliaments.” This book examines the culture at Television Without Pity and will appeal to students and researchers interested in audiences, digital culture and television studies.
Technoliberalism and the End of Participatory Culture in the United States

Author: Adam Fish

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319312569

Category: Social Science

Page: 217

View: 305

This new book examines whether television can be used as a tool not just for capitalism, but for democracy. Throughout television’s history, activists have attempted to access it for that very reason. New technologies—cable, satellite, and the internet—provided brief openings for amateur and activist engagement with television. This book elaborates on this history by using ethnographic data to build a new iteration of liberalism, technoliberalism, which sees Silicon Valley technology and the free market of Hollywood end the need for a politics of participation.
The Participatory Cultures Handbook

Author: Aaron Alan Delwiche

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780415882231

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 289

View: 919

How did we get from Hollywood to YouTube? What makes Wikipedia so different from a traditional encyclopedia? Has blogging dismantled journalism as we know it? Our media landscape has undergone a seismic shift as digital technology has fostered the rise of "participatory culture," in which knowledge is originated, created, distributed, and evaluated in radically new ways. The Participatory Cultures Handbook is an indispensable, interdisciplinary guide to this rapidly changing terrain. With short, accessible essays from leading geographers, political scientists, communication theorists, game designers, activists, policy makers, physicists, and poets, this volume will introduce students to the concept of participatory culture, explain how researchers approach participatory culture studies, and provide original examples of participatory culture in action. Topics include crowdsourcing, crisis mapping, grid computing, digital activism in authoritarian countries, collaborative poetry, collective intelligence, participatory budgeting, and the relationship between video games and civic engagement. Contributors include: Daren Brabham, Helen Burgess, Clay Calvert, Mia Consalvo, Kelly Czarnecki, David M. Faris, Dieter Fuchs, Owen Gallagher, Clive Goodinson, Alexander Halvais, Cynthia Hawkins, John Heaven, The Jannissary Collective, Henry Jenkins, Barry Joseph, Christopher Kelty, Pierre Lévy, Sophia B. Liu, Rolf Luehrs, Patrick Meier, Jason Mittell, Sarah Pearce, W. James Potter, Howard Rheingold, Suzanne Scott, Benjamin Stokes, Thomas Swiss, Paul Taylor, Will Venters, Jen Ziemke
Handbook of Research on Transmedia Storytelling and Narrative Strategies

Author: Y?lmaz, Recep

Publisher: IGI Global

ISBN: 9781522553588

Category: Social Science

Page: 599

View: 241

Transmedia storytelling is defined as a process where integral elements of fiction get dispersed systematically across multiple delivery channels to create a unified and coordinated entertainment experience. This process and its narrative models have had an increasing influence on the academic world in addressing both theoretical and practical dimensions of transmedia storytelling. The Handbook of Research on Transmedia Storytelling and Narrative Strategies is a critical scholarly resource that explores the connections between consumers of media content and information parts that come from multimedia platforms, as well as the concepts of narration and narrative styles. Featuring coverage on a wide range of topics such as augmented reality, digital society, and marketing strategies, this book explores narration as a method of relating to consumers. This book is ideal for advertising professionals, creative directors, academicians, scriptwriters, researchers, and upper-level graduate students seeking current research on narrative marketing strategies.
On the Fringes of Literature and Digital Media Culture

Author:

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004362352

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 270

View: 163

On the Fringes of Literature and Digital Media Culture presents a polyphonic account of mutual interpenetrations of literature and new media, highlighting the impact of digital culture on the user experience and the modes of social communication and interaction.
Cultural Appropriation in Fashion and Entertainment

Author: Yuniya Kawamura

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350170575

Category: Design

Page: 184

View: 359

Is it ever appropriate to “borrow” culturally inspired ideas? Who has ownership over intangible culture? What role does power inequality play? These questions are often at the center of heated public debates around cultural appropriation, with new controversies breaking seemingly every day. Cultural Appropriation in Fashion and Entertainment offers a sociological perspective on the debate, exploring appropriation of cultures embedded in race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, and religion in entertainment as well as the clothing, textiles, jewelry, accessories, hairstyles, and tattoos we wear. Case studies are drawn from K-pop, Bollywood dance, J-pop, Bhangra music, Jamaican reggae, hip hop and EDM fashion to explore how, when, and why cultural borrowing or appreciation can become cultural appropriation. There's also discussion of subcultural territories that extend beyond geography, race and ethnicity, such as cosplay and LGBTQI+ communities. By providing a range of global perspectives on the adoption, adaptation, and application of both tangible and intangible cultural objects, Kawamura and de Jong help move the conversation beyond simply criticizing designers and creators to encourage nuanced discussion and raise awareness of diverse cultures in the creative industries.