Prehistoric America

Author: Betty Jane Meggers

Publisher: AldineTransaction

ISBN: 9780202368122

Category: Nature

Page: 222

View: 813

The cultural parallels between widely separated but environmentally similar regions are often extraordinary, yet these parallels are discounted by anthropologists on the basis that they ignore a large mass of less similar data. Too often cultural parallels between distant regions have been taken for granted rather than recognized as phenomena that need to be explained. The thesis of Prehistoric America is that they are neither fortuitous nor inconsequential, but an indication of the strength of environmental pressures on cultural development. This work is an excellent introduction to the prehistoric cultures of North and South America, one that will help the reader to discover and enjoy the intellectual adventure of archeology.
Advanced Civilizations of Prehistoric America

Author: Frank Joseph

Publisher: Inner Traditions / Bear & Co

ISBN: 9781591431077

Category: History

Page: 328

View: 770

Frank Joseph reveals that modern civilization in North America was preceded by four advanced cultures that rose and fell over the past three thousand years. How they achieved greatness and why they vanished so completely are explored in this unconventional prehistory.
Prehistoric America

Author: Betty Meggers

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351496995

Category: Science

Page: 232

View: 194

During the past 30 years, the relationship between humans and the environment has changed more drastically than during any previous period in human history. Local sustainable exploitation of natural resources has been overridden by global interests indifferent to the detrimental impact of their activities on local environments and their inhabitants. Increasingly efficient technology has reduced the need for human labor, but improved medical treatment favors reproduction and survival, creating a growing imbalance between population density and food supply. Rapid transportation is introducing alien species to distant terrestrial and aquatic environments, where they displace critical elements in the local food chain.This succinct and profusely illustrated volume applies evolutionary and cultural theory to the interpretation of prehistoric cultural development in the western hemisphere. After reviewing cultural development in Mesoamerica and the central Andes, Meggers examines adaptation in North and South American regions with similar environments to evaluate the influence of adaptive constraints on cultural content.What made the human species dominant on the planet is the substitution of cultural behavior for biological behavior. Prehistoric Americans applied this ability to develop sustainable relationships with their environments. Many succeeded and others did not. Paleoclimatic reconstructions can be compared with archeological sequences and ethnographic descriptions to identify cultural behavior responsible for the difference. Comparison of the responses of Amazonians and Mayans to episodes of severe drought provides useful insights into what we are doing wrong.
Archaeology of Prehistoric Native America

Author: Guy E. Gibbon

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 081530725X

Category: Reference

Page: 1024

View: 289

This volume traces the modern critical and performance history of this play, one of Shakespeare's most-loved and most-performed comedies. The essay focus on such modern concerns as feminism, deconstruction, textual theory, and queer theory.
Prehistoric Culture Change on the Colorado Plateau

Author: Shirley Powell

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 9780816532872

Category: Social Science

Page: 236

View: 255

A collection of writings by participants in the Black Mesa Archaeological Project offers a synthesis of Kayenta-area archaeology, examining the ancestral Puebloan and Navajo occupation of the Four Corners region, and analysing faunal, lithic, ceramic, chronometric, and human osteological data, to construct an account of the prehistory and ethnohistory of northern Arizona that demonstrates how organizational variation and other aspects of culture change are largely a response to a changing natural environment.
The Bipoint in the Settlement of North America

Author: Wm Jack Hranicky

Publisher: Universal-Publishers

ISBN: 9781627342889

Category: Social Science

Page: 378

View: 465

This 378 page archaeological publication covers the development, definition, classification, and world-wide deployment of the lithic bipoint and includes numerous photographs, drawings, and maps. The bipoint is a legacy implement from the Old World that is found through time/space all over America. It was brought into the U.S. on both coasts; the Pacific Coast introduction was around 17,000 years ago and the Atlantic Coast was 23,000 years ago. The basic bipoint is defined and its manufacturing processes are presented along with bipoint properties, shape/form, resharpening, and cultural associations. This publication illustrates numerous bipoints from the Atlantic and Pacific states (and within the U.S.) and presents some of their inferred chronologies which are the oldest in the New World. Several morphologies between American and Iberian bipoints are compared, namely the famous Virginia Cinmar bipoint. It concludes that a Solutrean occupation did occur on the U.S. Atlantic coastal plain. The bipoint is the most misclassified artifact in American archaeology. The book is indexed and has extensive references.