Reading Testimony, Witnessing Trauma

Author: Eden Wales Freedman

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 9781496827371

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 244

View: 113

Theorists emphasize the necessity of writing about—or witnessing—trauma in order to overcome it. To this critical conversation, Reading Testimony, Witnessing Trauma: Confronting Race, Gender, and Violence in American Literature treats reader response to traumatic and testimonial literature written by and about African American women and adds insight into the engagement of testimonial literature. Eden Wales Freedman articulates a theory of reading (or dual-witnessing) that explores how narrators and readers can witness trauma together. She places these original theories of traumatic reception in conversation with the African American literary tradition to speak to the histories, cultures, and traumas of African Americans, particularly the repercussions of slavery, as witnessed in African American literature. The volume also considers intersections of race and gender and how narrators and readers can cross such constructs to witness collectively. Reading Testimony, Witnessing Trauma’s innovative examinations of raced-gendered intersections open and speak with those works that promote dual-witnessing through the fraught (literary) histories of race and gender relations in America. To explicate how dual-witnessing converses with American literature, race theory, and gender criticism, the book analyzes emancipatory narratives by Sojourner Truth, Harriet Jacobs, and Elizabeth Keckley and novels by William Faulkner, Zora Neale Hurston, Margaret Walker, Toni Morrison, and Jesmyn Ward.
Street Harassment as Everyday Violence

Author: Melinda A Mills

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9781666912388

Category:

Page: 239

View: 194

Melinda A. Mills investigates women's experiences with street harassment, recognizing this phenomenon as a form of everyday violence. The author argues that street harassment connects to other forms of violence that impact women's daily lives and that can cause "multiplicative trauma" in the wake.
Bearing Witness to the Witness

Author: Dana Amir

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351379472

Category: Psychology

Page: 170

View: 432

Bearing Witness to the Witness examines the different methods of testimony given by trauma victims and the ways in which these can enrich or undermine the ability of the reader to witness them. Years of listening to both direct and indirect testimonies on trauma has lead Dana Amir to identify four modes of witnessing trauma: the "metaphoric mode", the "metonymic mode," the "excessive mode" and the "Muselmann mode." In doing so, the author demonstrates the importance of testimony in understanding the nature of trauma, and therefore how to respond to trauma more adequately in a clinical psychoanalytic setting. To follow these four modes of interaction with the traumatic memory, the various chapters of the book present a close reading of three genres of traumatic witnessing: literary accounts by Holocaust survivors, memoirs (located between autobiographic recollection and fiction) and "raw" testimonies taken from Holocaust survivors. Since every traumatic testimonial narrative contains a combination of all four modes with various shifts between them, it is of crucial importance to identify the singular combination of modes that characterizes each traumatic narrative, focusing on the specific areas within which a shift occurs from one mode to another. Such a focus is extremely important, as illustrated and analyzed throughout this book, to the rehabilitation of the psychic metabolic system which conditions the digestion of traumatic materials, allowing a metaphoric working through of traumatic zones that were so far only accessible to repetition and evacuation. Bearing Witness to the Witness will appeal to trauma researchers of all research areas, including psychologists, psychoanalysts, literary scholars as well as philosophers of language and philosophers of the mind. The book will also be of interest and relevance to clinical psychologists, psychoanalytic candidates and graduate students in literary theory and criticism.
Contesting Childhood

Author: Kate Douglas

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 0813549159

Category: Social Science

Page: 236

View: 697

The late 1990s and early 2000s witnessed a surge in the publication and popularity of autobiographical writings about childhood. Linking literary and cultural studies, Contesting Childhood draws on a varied selection of works from a diverse range of authorsùfrom first-time to experienced writers. Kate Douglas explores Australian accounts of the Stolen Generation, contemporary American and British narratives of abuse, the bestselling memoirs of Andrea Ashworth, Augusten Burroughs, Robert Drewe, Mary Karr, Frank McCourt, Dave Pelzer, and Lorna Sage, among many others. Drawing on trauma and memory studies and theories of authorship and readership, Contesting Childhood offers commentary on the triumphs, trials, and tribulations that have shaped this genre. Douglas examines the content of the narratives and the limits of their representations, as well as some of the ways in which autobiographies of youth have become politically important and influential. This study enables readers to discover how stories configure childhood within cultural memory and the public sphere.
H.D. and Modernist Religious Imagination

Author: Elizabeth Anderson

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 9781441190895

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 208

View: 972

Exploring the intersection of religious sensibility and creativity in the poetry and prose of the American modernist writer, H.D., this volume explores the nexus of the religious, the visionary, the creative and the material. Drawing on original archival research and analyses of newly published and currently unpublished writings by H.D., Elizabeth Anderson shows how the poet's work is informed by a range of religious traditions, from the complexities and contradictions of Moravian Christianity to a wide range of esoteric beliefs and practices. H.D and Modernist Religious Imagination brings H.D.'s texts into dialogue with the French theorist Hélène Cixous, whose attention to writing, imagination and the sacred has been a neglected, but rich, critical and theological resource. In analysing the connection both writers craft between the sacred, the material and the creative, this study makes a thoroughly original contribution to the emerging scholarly conversation on modernism and religion, and the debate on the inter-relation of the spiritual and the material within the interdisciplinary field of literature and religion.
Genocide Literature in Middle and Secondary Classrooms

Author: Sarah Donovan

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781317220060

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 168

View: 918

At the heart of this inquiry into the ethical implications of education reform on reading practices in middle and secondary classrooms, the central question is what is lost, hidden, or marginalized in the name of progress? Drawing on her own experiences as an English teacher during the No Child Left Behind era, the author examines school cultures focused on meeting standards and measurable outcomes. She shows how genocide literature illuminates the ethics of reading and helps teachers and students rethink how literature should be taught in this modern, globalized era and the purposes of education more broadly.
Trauma and Literature

Author: J. Roger Kurtz

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781316821275

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 132

As a concept, 'trauma' has attracted a great deal of interest in literary studies. A key term in psychoanalytic approaches to literary study, trauma theory represents a critical approach that enables new modes of reading and of listening. It is a leading concept of our time, applicable to individuals, cultures, and nations. This book traces how trauma theory has come to constitute a discrete but influential approach within literary criticism in recent decades. It offers an overview of the genesis and growth of literary trauma theory, recording the evolution of the concept of trauma in relation to literary studies. In twenty-one essays, covering the origins, development, and applications of trauma in literary studies, Trauma and Literature addresses the relevance and impact this concept has in the field.
Images of Traumatic Memories

Author: Anja Meyer

Publisher: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht

ISBN: 9783847011637

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 175

View: 249

By employing the lens of the most recent critical studies on intermediality, the author analyses the interaction between literature and photography in three contemporary hybrid novels ( Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs, 2011, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer, 2005, and The Dark Room by Rachel Seiffert, 2001) sharing the narration of traumatic historical events. The intermedial dimension realised by the confluence of the two media devices offers new ways to create meaning and to reflect upon the nature of collective and individual trauma, by re-enacting the distortion and the inaccessibility to the memories of those experiences. In this context, the reader emerges as an active participant in the process of fiction-making, as the act of reading becomes a renewed act of witnessing.
Djuna Barnes and Affective Modernism

Author: Julie Taylor

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 9780748646760

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 232

View: 381

Explores the dynamic connections between the affective body and Djuna Barnes's textual corpus. Julie Taylor uses the writings of the American novelist, poet, dramatist, artist and journalist Djuna Barnes to form the basis of a series of disruptive questions about modernist aesthetics and the politics of reading.
Literary Aesthetics of Trauma

Author: Reina Van der Wiel

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137311016

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 255

View: 449

Literary Aesthetics of Trauma: Virginia Woolf and Jeanette Winterson investigates a fundamental shift, from the 1920s to the present day, in the way that trauma is aesthetically expressed. Modernism's emphasis on impersonality and narrative abstraction has been replaced by the contemporary trauma memoir and an ethical imperative to bear witness.