Scholarly Adventures in Digital Humanities

Author: Claire Battershill

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319472119

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 182

View: 806

This book addresses the gap between print and digital scholarly approaches by combining both praxis and theory in a case study of a new international collaborative digital project, the Modernist Archives Publishing Project (MAPP). MAPP is an international collaborative digital project, funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, that uses digital tools to showcase archival traces of twentieth-century publishing. The twenty-first century has witnessed, and is living through, some of the most dynamic changes ever experienced in the publishing industry, arguably altering our very understanding of what it means to read a book. This book brings to both general readers and scholarly researchers a new way of accessing, and thereby assessing, the historical meanings of change within the twentieth-century publication industry by building a resource which organises, interacts with, and uses historical information about book culture to narrate the continuities and discontinuities in reading and publishing over the last century.
Using Digital Humanities in the Classroom

Author: Claire Battershill

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350029774

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 232

View: 995

Rooted in the day-to-day experience of teaching and written for those without specialist technical knowledge, this book is the first practical guide to using digital tools and resources in the humanities classroom. Using Digital Humanities in the Classroom covers such topics as: · Overcoming resistance to technology – your own, your colleagues' and your students' · Finding, evaluating and using digital resources · Designing syllabi and planning classroom activities and assignments · Solving problems when technology goes wrong · Using digital tools for collaborative projects, course work and theses · Enhancing your teaching by finding support communities and connecting to your research Taking a step-by-step approach to incorporating digital humanities tools into your teaching, the book is also supported by a companion website, including tutorials, sample classroom activity prompts and assignments, and a bibliographic essay for each book chapter.
Using Digital Humanities in the Classroom

Author: Claire Battershill

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350029767

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 232

View: 608

Rooted in the day-to-day experience of teaching and written for those without specialist technical knowledge, this book is the first practical guide to using digital tools and resources in the humanities classroom. Using Digital Humanities in the Classroom covers such topics as: · Overcoming resistance to technology – your own, your colleagues' and your students' · Finding, evaluating and using digital resources · Designing syllabi and planning classroom activities and assignments · Solving problems when technology goes wrong · Using digital tools for collaborative projects, course work and theses · Enhancing your teaching by finding support communities and connecting to your research Taking a step-by-step approach to incorporating digital humanities tools into your teaching, the book is also supported by a companion website, including tutorials, sample classroom activity prompts and assignments, and a bibliographic essay for each book chapter.
Teaching Modernist Women's Writing in English

Author: Janine Utell

Publisher: Modern Language Association

ISBN: 9781603294874

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 232

View: 631

As authors and publishers, individuals and collectives, women significantly shaped the modernist movement. While figures such as Virginia Woolf and Gertrude Stein have received acclaim, authors from marginalized communities and those who wrote for mass, middlebrow audiences also created experimental and groundbreaking work. The essays in this volume explore formal aspects and thematic concerns of modernism while also challenging rigid notions of what constitutes literary value as well as the idea of a canon with fixed boundaries. The essays contextualize modernist women's writing in the material and political concerns of the early twentieth century and in life on the home front during wartime. They consider the original print contexts of the works and propose fresh digital approaches for courses ranging from high school through graduate school. Suggested assignments provide opportunities for students to write creatively and critically, recover forgotten literary works, and engage with their communities.
The Oxford Handbook of Virginia Woolf

Author: Anne E. Fernald

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198811589

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 688

View: 897

A Handbook on Woolf's achievements as an innovative novelist and pioneering feminist theorist. It studies her life, her works, her relationships with other writers, her professional career, and themes in her work including among others feminism, sexuality, education, and class.
Virginia Woolf and the World of Books

Author: Nicola Wilson

Publisher: Liverpool University Press

ISBN: 9781942954576

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 312

View: 564

Virginia Woolf and the World of Books will examine Leonard and Virginia Woolf’s Hogarth Press as a key intervention in modernist and women’s writing and mark its importance to independent publishing, bookselling, and print culture at large. The research in this volume coincides with the centenary of the founding of Hogarth Press in 1917, thus making a timely addition to scholarship on the Woolfs and print culture.
Modernist Lives

Author: Claire Battershill

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350043831

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 248

View: 564

Focusing on the biographies and autobiographies published by Leonard and Virginia Woolf's Hogarth Press from 1917-1946, Claire Battershill shows the importance of publishing history in understanding modernist literary work and culture. Modernist Lives draws on archival material from the Hogarth Press Business Archive and first editions from the Virginia Woolf Collection at the E. J. Pratt Library to show how the Woolfs' literary theories were expressed in all aspects of their publishing: their marketing strategies, editorial practice and the literary composition of their acquisitions. Featuring the works of figures such as Christopher Isherwood, Henry Green, Viola Tree, Vita Sackville-West and the Woolf's themselves, Battershill illuminates the history of Hogarth books from their composition to their reception by readers and critics.
Journalism History and Digital Archives

Author: Henrik Bødker

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000227024

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 180

View: 303

This book showcases various ways in which digital archives allow for new approaches to journalism history. The chapters in this book were selected based on three overall objectives: 1) research that highlights specific concerns within journalism history through digital archives; 2) discussions of digital methodologies, as well as specific applications, that are accessible for journalism scholars with no prior experiences with such approaches; and 3) that journalism history and digital archives are connected in other ways than through specific methods, i.e., that the connection raises larger questions of historiography and power. The contributions address cases and developments in Asia, South and North America and Europe; and range from long-range, big-data, machine-leaning and topic modelling studies of journalistic characteristics and meta-journalistic discourses to critiques of archival practices and access in relation to gender, social movements and poverty. The chapters in this book were originally published as a special issue of Digital Journalism.
Publishing Modernist Fiction and Poetry

Author: Jaillant Lise Jaillant

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 9781474440837

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 288

View: 839

Highlights the transformative impact that book publishers had on the modernist movementPublishing houses are nearly invisible in modernist studies. Looking beyond little magazines and other periodicals, this collection highlights the importance of book publishers in the diffusion of modernism. It also participates in the transnational turn in modernist studies, demonstrating that book publishers created new markets for modernist texts in the United States, Europe and the rest of the world. Key Features:The first volume on Anglo-American book publishers that sold difficult modernist texts to a wide range of readers around the worldSheds new light on the relationship between publishers and major modernist writersIncludes essays of broad significance written in an accessible proseDraws on extensive work in neglected archives
The Women Who Invented Twentieth-Century Children’s Literature

Author: Elizabeth West

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781000649581

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 246

View: 648

Publishing for children between 1930 and 1960 has been denigrated as a relatively fallow period for creativity and quality, certainly in comparison with the ‘golden ages’ of children’s literature that preceded and succeeded it. This book questions this perception by using archival evidence to argue that the work of what was predominantly a female group of editors, illustrators, authors and librarians (collectively referred to as bookwomen) resulted in many titles which are still considered as ‘classics’ today. The bookwomen reframed ideas about how children’s publishing should be approached and valued and, in doing so, laid the foundations for a subsequent generation of children’s authors and publishers who were to achieve far greater prominence. The key to the success of the bookwomen was their willingness to experiment, the strength of their relationships and their comprehensive understanding of the book production process. By focusing on a selection of women working across all aspects of the book production process, this book demonstrates that, both individually and collectively, women capitalised on their position as ‘other’ to the existing male institutions.
Stories of Becoming

Author: Claire Lutkewitte

Publisher: University Press of Colorado

ISBN: 9781646421640

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 216

View: 197

Based on findings from a multiyear, nationwide study of new faculty in the field of rhetoric and composition, Stories of Becoming provides graduate students—and those who train them—with specific strategies for preparing for a career in the professoriate. Through the use of stories, the authors invite readers to experience their collaborative research processes for conducting a nationwide survey, qualitative interviews, and textual analysis of professional documents. Using data from the study, the authors offer six specific strategies—including how to manage time, how to create a work/life balance, and how to collaborate with others—that readers can use to prepare for the composition and rhetoric job market and to begin their careers as full-time faculty members. Readers will learn about the possible responsibilities they may take on as new faculty, particularly those that go beyond teaching, research, service, and administration to include navigating the politics of higher education and negotiating professional identity construction. And they will also engage in activities and answer questions designed to deepen their understanding of the field and help them identify their own values and desired career trajectory. Stories of Becoming demystifies the professoriate, compares what current new faculty have to say of their job expectations with the realities that students might face when on the job, and brings to light the invisible, behind-the-scenes work done by new faculty. It will be invaluable to graduate students, those who teach graduate students, new faculty, and hiring administrators in composition and rhetoric.
British Literature in Transition, 1920–1940: Futility and Anarchy

Author: Charles Ferrall

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108751414

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 659

Literature from the 'political' 1930s has often been read in contrast to the 'aesthetic' 1920s. This collection suggests a different approach. Drawing on recent work expanding our sense of the political and aesthetic energies of interwar modernisms, these chapters track transitions in British literature. The strains of national break-up, class dissension and political instability provoked a new literary order, and reading across the two decades between the wars exposes the continuing pressure of these transitions. Instead of following familiar markers - 1922, the Crash, the Spanish Civil War - or isolating particular themes from literary study, this collection takes key problems and dilemmas from literature 'in transition' and reads them across familiar and unfamiliar cultural works and productions, in their rich and contradictory context of publication. Themes such as gender, sexuality, nation and class are thus present throughout these essays. Major writers such as Woolf are read alongside forgotten and marginalised voices.