Tax Increment Financing and Economic Development, Second Edition

Author: Craig L. Johnson

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9781438474977

Category: Political Science

Page: 366

View: 917

Examines the many issues raised by TIF, the most widely used tool of local economic and community development. This book brings together leading experts to examine the evolving nature of tax increment financing (TIF), the most widely used tool of local economic and community development. Originally designed as an innovative approach to the redevelopment of blighted areas, it has become a more general-purpose tool of economic and community development. Contributors offer case studies of the uses, structures, and impacts of TIF projects alongside more general discussions on the theoretical, financial, and legal bases for the use of TIF. They also explore its effect on overlapping jurisdictions such as cities, counties, and school districts. Some of the case studies capture TIF at its best—redeveloping areas that would likely never develop without substantial incentives. Other cases highlight questionable uses, especially where it has been used in new ways that those who developed the tool never envisioned. Originally published in 2001, the book was called “…a major contribution to the debate on the efficacy of such economic development financing tools as TIF…” by the journal Public Budgeting & Finance. Clear, comprehensive, and timely, this new edition features the latest research and thinking on TIF, including the political, legal, and even ethical issues surrounding its use.
Tax Increment Financing and Economic Development, Second Edition

Author: Craig L. Johnson

Publisher: State University of New York Press

ISBN: 9781438474991

Category: Political Science

Page: 368

View: 461

Examines the many issues raised by TIF, the most widely used tool of local economic and community development. This book brings together leading experts to examine the evolving nature of tax increment financing (TIF), the most widely used tool of local economic and community development. Originally designed as an innovative approach to the redevelopment of blighted areas, it has become a more general-purpose tool of economic and community development. Contributors offer case studies of the uses, structures, and impacts of TIF projects alongside more general discussions on the theoretical, financial, and legal bases for the use of TIF. They also explore its effect on overlapping jurisdictions such as cities, counties, and school districts. Some of the case studies capture TIF at its best—redeveloping areas that would likely never develop without substantial incentives. Other cases highlight questionable uses, especially where it has been used in new ways that those who developed the tool never envisioned. Originally published in 2001, the book was called “...a major contribution to the debate on the efficacy of such economic development financing tools as TIF...” by the journal Public Budgeting & Finance. Clear, comprehensive, and timely, this new edition features the latest research and thinking on TIF, including the political, legal, and even ethical issues surrounding its use. Craig L. Johnson is Associate Professor of Public Finance and Policy Analysis at Indiana University. He is the coauthor (with Martin J. Luby and Tima T. Moldogaziev) of State and Local Financial Instruments: Policy Changes and Management. Kenneth A. Kriz is University Distinguished Professor of Public Administration at the University of Illinois at Springfield.
Improving Tax Increment Financing (TIF) for Economic Development

Author: David Merriman

Publisher:

ISBN: 1558443789

Category:

Page: 72

View: 249

Great natural disasters are rare, but their aftermath can change the fortunes of a city or region forever. This book identifies lessons from different parts of the world to help communities and government leaders better organize for recovery after future disasters. The authors consider the processes and outcomes of community recovery and reconstruction following major disasters in six countries: China, New Zealand, India, Indonesia, Japan, and the United States. If done well, reconstruction can help break the cycle of disaster-related impacts and losses, and improve the resilience of a city or.
Practitioner's Guide to Economic Development Finance

Author: Toby Rittner

Publisher:

ISBN: 0578961199

Category:

Page:

View: 634

The Practitioner's Guide to Economic Development Finance is the only comprehensive resource dedicated to building and utilizing the development finance toolbox. The Practitioner's Guide provides the insight and practical information needed to critically understand how economic development is financed and the tools, strategies, and techniques used to build strong communities. From bonds, tax increment finance, and special districts to tax credits, seed & venture capital, revolving loan funds, and much more, this book outlines the financing tools required for succeeding in today's competitive economic development climate. The Practitioner's Guide covers:- Understanding development finance- Building the development finance toolbox- Bedrock tools- Targeted tools- Investment tools- Access to capital lending tools- Federal Support tools- Case studies
Encyclopedia of Public Administration and Public Policy, Second Edition - Three Volume Set (Print Version)

Author: Evan M. Berman

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN: IND:30000122431970

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 2480

View: 197

From the Nuremberg trials to the Civil Service Reform Act of 1978 to budget reconciliation bills, this encyclopedia provides coverage of watershed policies and decisions from such fields as privatization, biomedical ethics, education, and diversity. It also addresses issues such as the creation of the Department of Homeland Security.
Roads to Prosperity

Author: Gary Sands

Publisher: Wayne State University Press

ISBN: 9780814343609

Category: Political Science

Page: 394

View: 616

Roads to Prosperity: Economic Development Lessons from Midsize Canadian Cities explores the relative prosperity of midsize Canadian urban areas (population 50,000 to 400,000) over the past two decades. Communities throughout North America have strived for decades to maintain and enhance the prosperity of their residents. In the areas that are the focus of this research, the results of these efforts have been mixed—some communities have been relatively successful while others have fallen further behind the national averages. Midsize cities often lack the resources, both internal and external, to sustain and enhance their prosperity. Policies and strategies that have been successful in larger urban areas may be less effective (or unaffordable) in smaller ones. Roads to Prosperity first examines the economic structure of forty-two Canadian urban regions that fall within the midsize range to determine the economic specializations that characterize these communities and to trace how these specializations have evolved over the time period between 1991 and 2011. While urban areas with an economic base of natural resource or manufacturing industries tend to retain this economic function over the years, communities that rely on the service industries have been much more likely to experience some degree of restructuring in their economies over the past twenty years. The overall trend among these communities has been for their employment profiles to become more similar and for their economic specialization to fade over time. The second part of the book looks at a number of currently popular economic development strategies as they have been applied to midsize urban areas and their success and failures. While there appears to be no single economic development strategy that will lead to greater prosperity for every community, Sands and Reese explore the various factors that help eplain why some work and others don’t. Those with an interest in urban planning and community development will find this monograph highly informative.
Local Economic Development and the Environment

Author: Susan M. Opp

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN: 9781439880081

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 346

View: 844

A clear and practical examination of complex issues, Local Economic Development and the Environment: Finding Common Ground provides a broad, academic look at the intersection of two important areas for local administrators. In addition to managing development in a strained economic climate, most administrators are also expected to be stewards of the environment. However, economic conditions often leave them with limited options for pursuing economic development and, at the same time, being environmentally mindful. Many find themselves without a clear understanding of the concepts, tools, and best practices available to accomplish this herculean task. Translating complex environmental and economic concepts into easily applicable practices, the book: Gives practitioners the information they need to communicate with consultants, constituents, and officials, and to avoid ideological obstacles Compares regulatory differences between states and other geographical differences Includes examples from across the country to highlight variations in environmental regulations and laws Provides technical, legal, and political insights into the process of pursuing local economic development projects that incorporate protection and awareness Contains case studies that demonstrate the concepts in action, allowing readers to fully grasp the complexities associated with sustainable economic development Discusses how local administrators can balance the economic and environmental needs of the future Bridging the gap between policy-making intention and outcome, this book connects readers with a larger body of research that not only underpins practical applications but also helps them avoid legal, technical, and political obstacles. It provides an arsenal of best practices and everyday, easy-to-use strategies for optimizing the difficult balance between economic development and environmental protection.
Urban Redevelopment

Author: Barry Hersh

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317663065

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 172

View: 822

Urban redevelopment plays a major part in the growth strategy of the modern city, and the goal of this book is to examine the various aspects of redevelopment, its principles and practices in the North American context. Urban Redevelopment: A North American Reader seeks to shed light on the practice by looking at both its failures and successes, ideas that seemed to work in specific circumstances but not in others. The book aims to provide guidance to academics, practitioners and professionals on how, when, where and why, specific approaches worked and when they didn’t. While one has to deal with each case specifically, it is the interactions that are key. The contributors offer insight into how urban design affects behavior, how finance drives architectural choices, how social equity interacts with economic development, how demographical diversity drives cities’ growth, how politics determine land use decisions, how management deals with market choices, and how there are multiple influences and impacts of every decision. The book moves from the history of urban redevelopment, The City Beautiful movement, grand concourses and plazas, through urban renewal, superblocks and downtown pedestrian malls to today’s place-making: transit-oriented design, street quieting, new urbanism, publicly accessible, softer, waterfront design, funky small urban spaces and public-private megaprojects. This history also moves from grand masters such as Baron Haussmann and Robert Moses through community participation, to stakeholder involvement to creative local leadership. The increased importance of sustainability, high-energy performance, resilience and both pre- and post-catastrophe planning are also discussed in detail. Cities are acts of man, not nature; every street and building represents decisions made by people. Many of today’s best recognized urban theorists look for great forces; economic trends, technological shifts, political movements and try to analyze how they impact cities. One does not have to be a subscriber to the "great man" theory of history to see that in urban redevelopment, successful project champions use or sometimes overcome overall trends, using the tools and resources available to rebuild their community. This book is about how these projects are brought together, each somewhat differently, by the people who make them happen.