The Case for Working with Your Hands

Author: Matthew Crawford

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 9780141047294

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 234

View: 809

Why do some jobs offer fulfilment while others leave us frustrated? Why do we so often think of our working selves as separate from our �true� selves? Over the course of the twentieth century, we have separated mental work from manual labour, replacing the workshop with either the office cubicle or the factory line. In this inspiring and persuasive book, Matthew Crawford explores the dangers of this false distinction and presents instead the case for working with your hands. He brings to life the immense psychological and intellectual satisfactions of making and fixing things, explores the moral benefits of a technical education and, at a time when jobs are increasingly being outsourced over the internet, argues that the skilled manual trades may be one of the few sure paths to a good living. Drawing on the work of our greatest thinkers, from Aristotle to Heidegger, from Karl Marx to Iris Murdoch, as well as on his own experiences as an electrician and motorcycle mechanic, Crawford delivers a radical, timely and extremely enjoyable re-evaluation of our attitudes to work.
The Case for Working with Your Hands, Or, Why Office Work is Bad for Us and Fixing Things Feels Good

Author: Matthew B. Crawford

Publisher:

ISBN: 0670918741

Category: Psychology

Page: 246

View: 486

Why do some jobs offer fulfilment while others leave us frustrated? Why do we so often think of our working selves as separate from our ‘true’ selves?Over the course of the twentieth century, we have separated mental work from manual labour, replacing the workshop with either the office cubicle or the factory line. In this inspiring and persuasive book, Matthew Crawford explores the dangers of this false distinction and presents instead the case for working with your hands. He brings to life the immense psychological and intellectual satisfactions of making and fixing things, explores the moral benefits of a technical education and, at a time when jobs are increasingly being outsourced over the internet, argues that the skilled manual trades may be one of the few sure paths to a good living. Drawing on the work of our greatest thinkers, from Aristotle to Heidegger, from Karl Marx to Iris Murdoch, as well as on his own experiences as an electrician and motorcycle mechanic, Crawford delivers a radical, timely and extremely enjoyable re-evaluation of our attitudes to work.
The Case for Working with Your Hands

Author: Matthew Crawford

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 9780141954882

Category: Philosophy

Page: 256

View: 755

Why do some jobs offer fulfilment while others leave us frustrated? Why do we so often think of our working selves as separate from our 'true' selves? Over the course of the twentieth century, we have separated mental work from manual labour, replacing the workshop with either the office cubicle or the factory line. In this inspiring and persuasive book, Matthew Crawford explores the dangers of this false distinction and presents instead the case for working with your hands. He brings to life the immense psychological and intellectual satisfactions of making and fixing things, explores the moral benefits of a technical education and, at a time when jobs are increasingly being outsourced over the internet, argues that the skilled manual trades may be one of the few sure paths to a good living. Drawing on the work of our greatest thinkers, from Aristotle to Heidegger, from Karl Marx to Iris Murdoch, as well as on his own experiences as an electrician and motorcycle mechanic, Crawford delivers a radical, timely and extremely enjoyable re-evaluation of our attitudes to work.
The Humanity of Private Law

Author: Nicholas McBride

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781509911967

Category: Law

Page: 296

View: 650

The Humanity of Private Law presents a new way of thinking about English private law. Making a decisive break from earlier views of private law, which saw private law as concerned with wealth-maximisation or preserving relationships of mutual independence between its subjects, the author argues that English private law's core concern is the flourishing of its subjects. THIS VOLUME - presents a critique of alternative explanations of private law; - defines and sets out the key building blocks of private law; - sets out the vision of human flourishing (the RP) that English private law has in mind in seeking to promote its subjects' flourishing; - shows how various features of English private law are fine-tuned to ensure that its subjects enjoy a flourishing existence, according to the vision of human flourishing provided by the RP; - explains how other features of English private law are designed to preserve private law's legitimacy while it pursues its core concern of promoting human flourishing; - defends the view of English private law presented here against arguments that it does not adequately fit the rules and doctrines of private law, or that it is implausible to think that English private law is concerned with promoting human flourishing. A follow-up volume will question whether the RP is correct as an account of what human flourishing involves, and consider what private law would look like if it sought to give effect to a more authentic vision of human flourishing. The Humanity of Private Law is essential reading for students, academics and judges who are interested in understanding private law in common law jurisdictions, and for anyone interested in the nature and significance of human flourishing.
Why We Drive

Author: Matthew B. Crawford

Publisher: HarperCollins

ISBN: 9780062741981

Category: Transportation

Page: 368

View: 617

A brilliant and defiant celebration of driving as a unique pathway of human freedom, by "one of the most influential thinkers of our time" (Sunday Times) "Why We Drive weaves philosophers, thinkers, and scientific research with shade-tree mechanics and racers to defend our right to independence, making the case that freedom of motion is essential to who we are as a species. ... We hope you'll read it." —Road & Track Once we were drivers, the open road alive with autonomy, adventure, danger, trust, and speed. Today we are as likely to be in the back seat of an Uber as behind the wheel ourselves. Tech giants are hurling us toward a shiny, happy “self-driving” future, selling utopia but equally keen to advertise to a captive audience strapped into another expensive device. Are we destined, then, to become passengers, not drivers? Why We Drive reveals that much more may be at stake than we might think. Ten years ago, in the New York Times-bestselling Shop Class as Soulcraft, philosopher-mechanic Matthew B. Crawford—a University of Chicago PhD who owned his own motorcycle shop—made a revolutionary case for manual labor, one that ran headlong against the pretentions of white-collar office work. Now, using driving as a window through which to view the broader changes wrought by technology on all aspects of contemporary life, Crawford investigates the driver’s seat as one of the few remaining domains of skill, exploration, play—and freedom. Blending philosophy and hands-on storytelling, Crawford grounds the narrative in his own experience in the garage and behind the wheel, recounting his decade-long restoration of a vintage Volkswagen as well as his journeys to thriving automotive subcultures across the country. Crawford leads us on an irreverent but deeply considered inquiry into the power of faceless bureaucracies, the importance of questioning mindless rules, and the battle for democratic self-determination against the surveillance capitalists. A meditation on the competence of ordinary people, Why We Drive explores the genius of our everyday practices on the road, the rewards of “folk engineering,” and the existential value of occasionally being scared shitless. Witty and ingenious throughout, Why We Drive is a rebellious and daring celebration of the irrepressible human spirit.
The World Beyond Your Head

Author: Matthew B. Crawford

Publisher: Viking

ISBN: 024101848X

Category: Attention

Page: 320

View: 140

Why do we feel overwhelmed by the ever-increasing demands on our attention? And how do we focus on what's really important in our lives? In this brilliant follow-up to his international bestseller The Case for Working with Your Hands, the widely acclaimed thinker Matthew Crawford investigates the challenge of mastering one's own mind. For we often complain today about our mental lives being fractured and our focus being disrupted - but he shows that this current crisis of attention is only superficially the result of digital technology. It should really be understood as the result of long-held assumptions of individualism in Western culture that are profoundly at odds with human nature. Exploring the intense focus of ice-hockey players, the zoned-out behaviour of gambling addicts, the inherited craft of building pipe organs and the familiar hassles of daily life, Crawford shows that, far from being isolated minds, we are inherently physical and social beings, born into a world shaped by previous generations. In order to flourish, we need to establish meaningful connections with the world, the people around us and the historical moment we live in. Drawing on the latest findings of cognitive and behavioural science, the insights of moral philosophy, reportage and cultural references from Mickey Mouse to the Kinsey Report, The World Beyond Your Headmakes sense of a vast array of common experiences, from waiting at the airport to the rise of the hipster. It has profound implications for our attitudes to work, family and government. This is an astonishing work of urgent relevance to our times. 'One of the most influential thinkers of our time.' Sunday Times