The Emigrant's Pocket Companion

Author: Robert Mudie

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN: 1331594553

Category: History

Page: 298

View: 715

Excerpt from The Emigrant's Pocket Companion: Containing What Emigration Is Who Should Be Emigrants, Where Emigrants Should Go; A Description of British North America, Especially the Canadas, and Full Instructions to Intending Emigrants Here it would be unjust to conceal the fact, that ignorance begins at the very fountain head, and contaminates the whole matter, down to the employ ment of the humblest settler. It is always found that, when lines of road or canal have to be made, the ground has to be purchased at double its value; and the public interest is sacrificed for that of private individuals. To do, and then to consider what should have been done; to sell, and then to survey, is the system: but the agent gets his place, as a reward for something or nothing, and that reward is the office fee on the mere sale. Ac curate surveying is, no doubt, both a difficult and costly matter, even in an old country, and it must be much more so in a new one; but it is an ex pense which if laid out at the first, would be saved a hundred fold in the end. It would not be amiss that we should, in those regions from which we drive the savages of America, imitate the ex ample of the Romans, when they drove the demi savages of Europe before them - they made a road across the country, and when they came to the river, they builded a bridge. We make a map, and write a book; but leave the country as we found it. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.