The Evolution of Culture in Animals

Author: John Tyler Bonner

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691186986

Category: Science

Page: 216

View: 508

Animals do have culture, maintains this delightfully illustrated and provocative book, which cites a number of fascinating instances of animal communication and learning. John Bonner traces the origins of culture back to the early biological evolution of animals and provides examples of five categories of behavior leading to nonhuman culture: physical dexterity, relations with other species, auditory communication within a species, geographic locations, and inventions or innovations. Defining culture as the transmission of information by behavioral rather than genetical means, he demonstrates the continuum between the traits we find in animals and those we often consider uniquely human.
The Arts and the Definition of the Human

Author: Joseph Margolis

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 9780804769860

Category: Philosophy

Page: 200

View: 330

The Arts and the Definition of the Human introduces a novel theory that our selves—our thoughts, perceptions, creativity, and other qualities that make us human—are determined by our place in history, and more particularly by our culture and language. Margolis rejects the idea that any concepts or truths remain fixed and objective through the flow of history and reveals that this theory of the human being (or "philosophical anthropology") as culturally determined and changing is necessary to make sense of art. He shows that a painting, sculpture, or poem cannot have a single correct interpretation because our creation and perception of art will always be mitigated by our historical and cultural contexts. Calling upon philosophers ranging from Parmenides and Plato to Kant, Hegel, and Wittgenstein, art historians from Damisch to Elkins, artists from Van Eyck to Michelangelo to Wordsworth to Duchamp, Margolis creates a philosophy of art interwoven with his philosophical anthropology which pointedly challenges prevailing views of the fine arts and the nature of personhood.
The Question of Animal Culture

Author: Kevin N. Laland

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674031261

Category: Science

Page: 368

View: 418

Fifty years ago, a troop of Japanese macaques was observed washing sandy sweet potatoes in a stream, sending ripples through the fields of ethology, comparative psychology, and cultural anthropology. The issue of animal culture has been hotly debated ever since. Now Kevin Laland and Bennett Galef have gathered key voices in the often rancorous debate to summarize the views along the continuum from “Culture? Of course!” to “Culture? Of course not!” The result is essential reading for anyone interested in the validity of animal culture, and what it might say about our own.
Primate Behaviour

Author: Duane Quiatt

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521498325

Category: Science

Page: 340

View: 108

Stressing direct connections between human and nonhuman society, this book about the social life of monkeys, apes and humans emphasizes the importance of social information and knowledge in the understanding of primate behavior and organization.
The Evolution of Cognition

Author: Cecilia M. Heyes

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262082861

Category: Psychology

Page: 412

View: 605

In the last decade, "evolutionary psychology" has come to refer exclusively to research on human mentality and behavior, motivated by a nativist interpretation of how evolution operates. This book encompasses the behavior and mentality of nonhuman as well as human animals and a full range of evolutionary approaches. Rather than a collection by and for the like-minded, it is a debate about how evolutionary processes have shaped cognition. The debate is divided into five sections: Orientations, on the phylogenetic, ecological, and psychological/comparative approaches to the evolution of cognition; Categorization, on how various animals parse their environments, how they represent objects and events and the relations among them; Causality, on whether and in what ways nonhuman animals represent cause and effect relationships; Consciousness, on whether it makes sense to talk about the evolution of consciousness and whether the phenomenon can be investigated empirically in nonhuman animals; and Culture, on the cognitive requirements for nongenetic transmission of information and the evolutionary consequences of such cultural exchange. ContributorsBernard Balleine, Patrick Bateson, Michael J. Beran, M. E. Bitterman, Robert Boyd, Nicola Clayton, Juan Delius, Anthony Dickinson, Robin Dunbar, D.P. Griffiths, Bernd Heinrich, Cecilia Heyes, William A. Hillix, Ludwig Huber, Nicholas Humphrey, Masako Jitsumori, Louis Lefebvre, Nicholas Mackintosh, Euan M. Macphail, Peter Richerson, Duane M. Rumbaugh, Sara Shettleworth, Martina Siemann, Kim Sterelny, Michael Tomasello, Laura Weiser, Alexandra Wells, Carolyn Wilczynski, David Sloan Wilson
Awakening Earth

Author: Duane Elgin

Publisher: William Morrow & Company

ISBN: STANFORD:36105004040346

Category: Philosophy

Page: 392

View: 548

Balances science with spirituality in a study of human evolution, from the appearance of reflective consciousness to modern communications, and proposes three additional stages to be realized
Evolution, Culture, and the Human Mind

Author: Mark Schaller

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9781136950506

Category: FAMILY & RELATIONSHIPS

Page: 300

View: 733

Evolution, Culture, and the Human Mind is the first scholarly book to integrate evolutionary and cultural perspectives on human psychology. The contributors include world-renowned evolutionary, cultural, social, and cognitive psychologists. These chapt.
Evolution, Culture, and Consciousness

Author: Thomas Edward McNamara

Publisher: University Press of America

ISBN: 076182765X

Category: Psychology

Page: 324

View: 580

Thomas McNamara, in Evolution, Culture, and Consciousness, presents the first comprehensive theory of human perception and consciousness based on the generally accepted principles of evolutionary psychology. This theory, building on the best evolutionary research, explains that just a few simple neurological changes in the primate brain account for human speech, self-consciousness and the creation of meaning out of experience. All primates can learn, but our species evolved a new instinct for learning, which makes childhood learning just as powerful as the other biological instincts found in all other primates. McNamara shows that children are genetically programmed to learn not just what to think, but how to think, shaping the preconscious process for creating meaning out of experience. However, because our environment has changed radically since our origin, this archaic form of consciousness has become a major block to human development and success. After explaining how we have all been programmed to preconsciously create meaning out of experience, McNamara shows how we can create a new and more successful way of thinking and feeling, resulting in a happier, more productive, stress free life.
Evolution of Culture

Author: Kevin N. Laland

Publisher:

ISBN: 0691151180

Category:

Page: 480

View: 864

Humans possess an extraordinary capacity for cultural production, from the arts and language to science and technology. How did the human mind--and the uniquely human ability to devise and transmit culture--evolve from its roots in animal behavior? Darwin's Unfinished Symphony presents a captivating new theory of human cognitive evolution. This compelling and accessible book reveals how culture is not just the magnificent end product of an evolutionary process that produced a species unlike all others--it is also the key driving force behind that process. Kevin Laland shows how the learned and socially transmitted activities of our ancestors shaped our intellects through accelerating cycles of evolutionary feedback. The truly unique characteristics of our species--such as our intelligence, language, teaching, and cooperation--are not adaptive responses to predators, disease, or other external conditions. Rather, humans are creatures of their own making. Drawing on his own groundbreaking research, and bringing it to life with vivid natural history, Laland explains how animals imitate, innovate, and have remarkable traditions of their own. He traces our rise from scavenger apes in prehistory to modern humans able to design iPhones, dance the tango, and send astronauts into space. This book tells the story of the painstaking fieldwork, the key experiments, the false leads, and the stunning scientific breakthroughs that led to this new understanding of how culture transformed human evolution. It is the story of how Darwin's intellectual descendants picked up where he left off and took up the challenge of providing a scientific account of the evolution of the human mind.
Social Learning In Animals

Author: Cecilia M. Heyes

Publisher: Elsevier

ISBN: 0080541313

Category: Nature

Page: 411

View: 968

The increasing realization among behaviorists and psychologists is that many animals learn by observation as members of social systems. Such settings contribute to the formation of culture. This book combines the knowledge of two groups of scientists with different backgrounds to establish a working consensus for future research. The book is divided into two major sections, with contributions by a well-known, international, and interdisciplinary team which integrates these growing areas of inquiry. Key Features * Integrates the broad range of scientific approaches being used in the studies of social learning and imitation, and society and culture * Provides an introduction to this field of study as well as a starting point for the more experienced researcher * Chapters are succinct reviews of innovative discoveries and progress made during the past decade * Includes statements of varied theoretical perspectives on controversial topics * Authoritative contributions by an international team of leading researchers
Humans and Animals: A Geography of Coexistence

Author: Julie Urbanik

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 9781440838354

Category: Nature

Page: 466

View: 637

An engaging and at times sobering look at the coexistence of humans and animals in the 21st century and how their sometimes disparate needs affect environments, politics, economies, and culture worldwide. • Includes excerpts from 20 primary source documents related to animals • Offers a comprehensive look at a variety of aspects of human-animal relationships • Discusses how human actions affect the survival of other species, such as the northern spotted owl and bluefin tuna