Trauma and the Ontology of the Modern Subject

Author: John L. Roberts

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1138826731

Category: Psychic trauma

Page: 230

View: 966

Recent scholarship has inquired into the socio-historical, discursive genesis of trauma. Trauma and the Ontology of the Modern Subject, however, seeks what has not been actualized in trauma studies � that is, how the necessity and unassailable intensity of trauma is fastened to its historical emergence. We must ask not only what trauma means for the individual person�s biography, but also what it means to be the historical subject of trauma. In other words, how does being human in this current period of history implicate one�s lived possibilities that are threatened, and perhaps framed, through trauma? Foucauldian sensibilities inform a critical and structural analysis that is hermeneutically grounded.� Drawing on the history of ideas and on Lacan�s work in particular, John L. Roberts argues that what we mean by trauma has developed over time, and that it is intimately tied with an ontology of the subject; that is to say, what it is to be, and means to be human. He argues that modern subjectivity � as articulated by Heidegger, Levinas, and Lacan � is structurally traumatic, founded in its finitude as self-withdrawal in time, its temporal self-absence becoming the very conditions for agency, truth and knowledge. The book also argues that this fractured temporal horizon � as an effect of an interrupting Otherness or alterity � is obscured through the discourses and technologies of the psy-disciplines (psychiatry, psychology, and psychotherapy). Consideration is given to social, political, and economic consequences of this concealment. Trauma and the Ontology of the Modern Subject will be of enduring interest to psychoanalysts and psychotherapists as well as scholars of philosophy and cultural studies.
Trauma and the Ontology of the Modern Subject

Author: John L. Roberts

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317401650

Category: Philosophy

Page: 230

View: 380

Recent scholarship has inquired into the socio-historical, discursive genesis of trauma. Trauma and the Ontology of the Modern Subject, however, seeks what has not been actualized in trauma studies – that is, how the necessity and unassailable intensity of trauma is fastened to its historical emergence. We must ask not only what trauma means for the individual person’s biography, but also what it means to be the historical subject of trauma. In other words, how does being human in this current period of history implicate one’s lived possibilities that are threatened, and perhaps framed, through trauma? Foucauldian sensibilities inform a critical and structural analysis that is hermeneutically grounded. Drawing on the history of ideas and on Lacan’s work in particular, John L. Roberts argues that what we mean by trauma has developed over time, and that it is intimately tied with an ontology of the subject; that is to say, what it is to be, and means to be human. He argues that modern subjectivity – as articulated by Heidegger, Levinas, and Lacan – is structurally traumatic, founded in its finitude as self-withdrawal in time, its temporal self-absence becoming the very conditions for agency, truth and knowledge. The book also argues that this fractured temporal horizon – as an effect of an interrupting Otherness or alterity – is obscured through the discourses and technologies of the psy-disciplines (psychiatry, psychology, and psychotherapy). Consideration is given to social, political, and economic consequences of this concealment. Trauma and the Ontology of the Modern Subject will be of enduring interest to psychoanalysts and psychotherapists as well as scholars of philosophy and cultural studies.
Embodied Trauma and Healing

Author: Anna Westin

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000544787

Category: Psychology

Page: 220

View: 283

What if philosophy could solve the psychological puzzle of trauma? Embodied Trauma and Healing argues just that, suggesting that one might be needed in order to understand the other. The book demonstrates how the body-mind problem that haunted Descartes was addressed by phenomenologists, whilst also proposing that the human experience is lived subjectively as embodied consciousness. Throughout this book, the author suggests that the phenomenological tools that are used to explore the body can also be an effective way to discuss the physical and mental aspects of embodied trauma. Drawing on the work of Paul Ricœur, Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Emmanuel Lévinas, the book outlines a phenomenological approach to the embodied and relational subject. It offers a reading of embodied trauma that can connect it to wider conversations in psychological underpinnings of trauma through Peter Levine’s somatic research and Bessel van der Kolk’s embodied remembering. Connecting to the analytic tradition, the book suggests that phenomenology can unify both language-based and body-based therapeutic practice. It also presents a compelling discussion that ties the embodied experience of relation in trauma to the wider causal factors of social suffering and relational rupture, intergenerational trauma and the trauma of land, as informed by phenomenology. Embodied Trauma and Healing is essential reading for researchers within the fields of philosophy, psychology and medical humanities for it actively engages with contemporary configurations of trauma theory and recent research developments in healing and mental disorder diagnosis.
Crisis, Trauma, and Disaster

Author: Linda Lutisha Black

Publisher: SAGE Publications

ISBN: 9781483369051

Category: Psychology

Page: 344

View: 416

Crisis, Trauma, and Disaster: A Clinician′s Guide teaches counselors how to respond and intervene with individuals, groups and organizations. The book begins with a description of the counselor’s role and responsibilities and then presents chapters on crisis, trauma and disasters with corresponding chapters on working with those affected. Each chapter defines the issue and contrasts it with general counseling requirements, and then presents the history and theory as well as common interventions. Each chapter contains The Counselor’s Toolkit and presents assessment, case conceptualization and treatment approaches followed by case illustrations. The text concludes with a chapter on emerging trends and a chapter on caring for those who care.
Psychoanalysis, History, and Radical Ethics

Author: Donna Orange

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000682342

Category: Psychology

Page: 182

View: 100

Psychoanalysis, History, and Radical Ethics: Learning to Hear explores the importance of listening, being able to speak, and those who are silenced, from a psychoanalytic perspective. In particular, it focuses on those voices silenced either collectively or individually by trauma, culture, discrimination and persecution, and even by the history of psychoanalysis. Drawing on lessons from philosophy and history as well as clinical vignettes, this book provides a comprehensive guide to understanding the role of trauma in creating silence, and the importance for psychoanalysts of learning to hear those silenced voices.
Melancholy and the Archive

Author: Jonathan Boulter

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 9781441185358

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 224

View: 169

Melancholy and the Archive examines how trauma, history and memory are represented in key works of major contemporary writers such as David Mitchell, Paul Auster, Haruki Murakami and Jose Saramago. The book explores how these authors construct crucial relationships between sites of memory-the archive becomes a central trope here-and the self that has been subjected to various traumas, various losses. The archive-be it a bureaucratic office (Saramago), an underground bunker (Auster), a geographical space or landscape (Mitchell) or even a hole (Murakami)-becomes the means by which the self attempts to preserve and conserve his or her sense of history even as the economy of trauma threatens to erase the grounds of such preservation: as the subject or self is threatened so the archive becomes a festishized site wherein history is housed, accommodated, created, even fabricated. The archive, in Freudian terms, becomes a space of melancholy precisely as the subject preserves not only a personal history or a culture's history, but also the history of the traumas that necessitates the creation of the archive as such.
Sovereign Lives

Author: Jenny Edkins

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135937942

Category: Political Science

Page: 292

View: 740

For International Relations scholars, discussions of globalization inevitably turn to questions of sovereignty. How much control does a country have over its borders, people and economy? Where does that authority come from? Sovereign Lives explores these changes through reading of humanitarian intervention, human rights discourses, securitization, refugees, the fragmentation of identities and the practices of development.
Psychoanalysis and the Unrepresentable

Author: Agnieszka Piotrowska

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781317355762

Category: Psychology

Page: 246

View: 313

Psychoanalysis and the Unrepresentable opens a space for meaningful debate about translating psychoanalytic concepts from the work of clinicians to that of academics and back again. Focusing on the idea of the unrepresentable, this collection of essays by psychoanalysts, psychotherapists, counsellors, artists and film and literary scholars attempts to think through those things that are impossible to be thought through completely. Offering a unique insight into areas like trauma studies, where it is difficult – if not impossible – to express one’s feelings, the collection draws from psychoanalysis in its broadest sense and acts as a gesture against the fixed and the frozen. Psychoanalysis and the Unrepresentable is presented in six parts: Approaching Trauma, Sense and Gesture, Impossible Poetics, Without Words, Wounds and Suture and Auto/Fiction. The chapters therein address topics including touch and speech, adoption, the other and grief, and examine films including Gus Van Sant’s Milk and Michael Haneke’s Amour. As a whole, the book brings to the fore those things which are difficult to speak about, but which must be spoken about. The discussion in this book will be key reading for psychoanalysts, including those in training, psychotherapists and psychotherapeutically-engaged scholars, academics and students of culture studies, psychosocial studies, applied philosophy and film studies, filmmakers and artists.
New Philosophy of Social Conflict

Author: Leonard C. Hawes

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781472532657

Category: Philosophy

Page: 240

View: 585

A New Philosophy of Social Conflict joins in the contemporary conflict resolution and transitional justice debates by contributing a Deleuze-Guattarian reading of the post-genocide justice and reconciliation experiment in Rwanda -the Gacaca courts. In doing so, Hawes addresses two significant problems for which the work of Deleuze and Guattari provides invaluable insight: how to live ethically with the consequences of conflict and trauma and how to negotiate the chaos of living through trauma, in ways that create self-organizing, discursive processes for resolving and reconciling these ontological dilemmas in life-affirming ways. Hawes draws on Deleuze-Guattarian thinking to create new concepts that enable us to think more productively and to live more ethically in a world increasingly characterized by sociocultural trauma and conflict, and to imagine alternative ways of resolving and reconciling trauma and conflict.
Choreographies of the Living

Author: Carrie Rohman

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190604400

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 201

View: 306

Nude vibrations: Isadora Duncan's creatural aesthetic -- Creative incantations and involutions in D.H. Lawrence -- Woolf's floating monkeys and whirling women -- Strange prosthetics: Rachel Rosenthal's rats and rings -- Uncaging Cunningham's animals