Voodoos and Obeahs

Author: Joseph J. Williams

Publisher: BEYOND BOOKS HUB

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page:

View: 666

Voodoos and Obeahs examines the history of these beliefs and traditions in the Caribbean, specifically in Jamaica and Haiti. It also traces them back to their roots in Africa and discusses the influence that imperialism, slavery, and racism had on their development.
Voodoo and Obeahs

Author: Joseph Williams

Publisher: BoD – Books on Demand

ISBN: 9783748119005

Category: Religion

Page: 163

View: 799

Just as fetishism was for a long time accepted as a generic term covering all that was nefarious in the customs of the West African tribes, so in the popular mind today, Voodoo and Obeah are interchangeable and signify alike whatever is weird and eerie in the practices of the descendants of these same tribes as they are found throughout the West Indies and the southern portion of the United States. And yet technically, not only are Voodoo and Obeah specifically distinct, one from the other, both in origin and in practice, but if we are to understand the true force and influence which they originally exercised over their devotees, we must dissociate them from the countless other forms of magic, black or white, that have gradually impinged themselves upon them as so many excrescences.
Ecowomanism at the Panamá Canal

Author: Sofía Betancourt

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9781793641397

Category: Religion

Page: 163

View: 784

In Ecowomanism at the Panamá Canal, Sofia Betancourt constructs environmental ethics at the intersection of the global North and global South. Betancourt explores transnational environmental justice through the lived experience of women from the African Diaspora who migrated to Panamá to work on the Canal.
Narratives of Obeah in West Indian Literature

Author: Janelle Rodriques

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780429998652

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 839

This book explores representations of Obeah – a name used in the English/Creole-speaking Caribbean to describe various African-derived, syncretic Caribbean religious practices – across a range of prose fictions published in the twentieth century by West Indian authors. In the Caribbean and its diasporas, Obeah often manifests in the casting of spells, the administration of baths and potions of various oils, herbs, roots and powders, and sometimes spirit possession, for the purposes of protection, revenge, health and well-being. In most Caribbean territories, the practice – and practices that may resemble it – remains illegal. Narratives of Obeah in West Indian Literature analyses fiction that employs Obeah as a marker of the Black ‘folk’ aesthetics that are now constitutive of West Indian literary and cultural production, either in resistance to colonial ideology or in service of the same. These texts foreground Obeah as a social and cultural logic both integral to and troublesome within the creation of such a thing as ‘West Indian’ literature and culture, at once a product of and a foil to Caribbean plantation societies. This book explores the presentation of Obeah as an ‘unruly’ narrative subject, one that not only subverts but signifies a lasting ‘Afro-folk’ sensibility within colonial and ‘postcolonial’ writing of the West Indies. Narratives of Obeah in West Indian Literature will be of interest to scholars and students of Caribbean Literature, Diaspora Studies, and African and Caribbean religious studies; it will also contribute to dialogues of spirituality in the wider Black Atlantic.
Voodoos and Obeahs

Author: Joseph J. Williams

Publisher: Vamzzz Publishing

ISBN: 9492355116

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 374

View: 224

Voodoos and Obeahs offers a careful documentation of the history and ethnography of Voodoo and reveals the connection of both Haitian Voodoo and Jamaican Obeah to snake worship (ophioletreia). In Jamaica, Obeah is the general term to denote those Africans who in the island practice witchcraft or sorcery. Williams includes numerous quotations from rare documents and books on the topic. This work goes into great depth concerning the New World-African connection and is highly recommended if you want a deep understanding of the dramatic historical background of Haitian and Jamaican magic and witchcraft, and the profound influence of imperialism, slavery and racism on its development. Williams is best known for his anthropological writings about African and Caribbean people, which include Whispering of the Caribbean, Whence the "Black Irish" of Jamaica?, Psychic Phenomena in Jamaica and Africa's God. Preview on www.vamzzz.com
The Voodoo Encyclopedia: Magic, Ritual, and Religion

Author: Jeffrey E. Anderson

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 9781610692090

Category: Religion

Page: 438

View: 560

This compelling reference work introduces the religions of Voodoo, a onetime faith of the Mississippi River Valley, and Vodou, a Haitian faith with millions of adherents today. • Addresses both Vodou and Voodoo • Situates the religions both religiously and historically • Examines the African contributions to the faiths on a regional basis • Introduces important gods and ceremonies
Voodoo and Obeahs

Author: Joseph Williams

Publisher: CreateSpace

ISBN: 1505830524

Category:

Page: 324

View: 855

Just as fetishism was for a long time accepted as a generic term covering all that was nefarious in the customs of the West African tribes, so in the popular mind today, Voodoo and Obeah are interchangeable and signify alike whatever is weird and eerie in the practices of the descendants of these same tribes as they are found throughout the West Indies and the southern portion of the United States. And yet technically, not only are Voodoo and Obeah specifically distinct, one from the other, both in origin and in practice, but if we are to understand the true force and influence which they originally exercised over their devotees, we must dissociate them from the countless other forms of magic, black or white, that have gradually impinged themselves upon them as so many excrescences.