Public Choice Analyses of American Economic History

Author: Joshua Hall

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319775920

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 199

View: 259

This book - the first of two volumes- looks at episodes in American economic history from a public choice perspective. Each chapter discusses citizens, special interests, and government officials responding to economic incentives in both markets and politics. In doing so, the book provides fresh insights into important periods of American history, from the Acadian expulsion in 1755 to the allocation of government grants during the New Deal. This volume features the work of prominent economic historians such as Dora Costa, John Wallis, and Jeremy Atack; well-known public choice scholars such as Jac Heckelman; and younger scholars such as Vincent Geloso and Philip Magness. This book will be useful for researchers and students interested in economics, history, political science, economic history, public choice, and political economy.
The Invasion of Indian Country in the Twentieth Century

Author: Donald Fixico

Publisher: University Press of Colorado

ISBN: 9781607321491

Category: History

Page: 278

View: 184

The Invasion of Indian Country in the Twentieth Century, Second Edition is updated through the first decade of the twenty-first century and contains a new chapter challenging Americans--Indian and non-Indian--to begin healing the earth. This analysis of the struggle to protect not only natural resources but also a way of life serves as an indispensable tool for students or anyone interested in Native American history and current government policy with regard to Indian lands or the environment.
Native Americans and the Criminal Justice System

Author: Jeffrey Ian Ross

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317255666

Category: Social Science

Page: 290

View: 181

'This collection presents significant summaries of past criminal behavior, and significant new cultural and political contextualizations that provide greater understanding of the complex effects of crime, sovereignty, culture, and colonization on crime and criminalization on Indian reservations.' Duane Champagne, UCLA (From the Foreword) Native Americans and the Criminal Justice System offers a comprehensive approach to explaining the causes, effects, and solutions for the presence and plight of Native Americans in the criminal justice system. Articles from scholars and experts in Native American issues examine the ways in which society's response to Native Americans is often socially constructed. The contributors work to dispel the myths surrounding the crimes committed by Native Americans and assertions about the role of criminal justice agencies that interact with Native Americans. In doing so, the contributors emphasize the historical, social, and cultural roots of Anglo European conflicts with Native peoples and how they are manifested in the criminal justice system. Selected chapters also consider the global and cross-national ramifications of Native Americans and crime. This book systematically analyzes the broad nature of the subject area, including unique and emerging problems, theoretical issues, and policy implications.