What Was the Titanic?

Author: Stephanie Sabol

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9780515157277

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 112

View: 580

For more than 100 years, people have been captivated by the disastrous sinking of the Titanic that claimed over 1,500 lives. Now young readers can find out why the great ship went down and how it was discovered seventy-five years later. At 2:20 a.m. on April 15, 1912, the Royal Mail Steamer Titanic, the largest passenger steamship of this time, met its catastrophic end after crashing into an iceberg. Of the 2,240 passengers and crew onboard, only 705 survived. More than 100 years later, today's readers will be intrigued by the mystery that surrounds this ship that was originally labeled "unsinkable."
Titanic Scandal

Author: Senan Molony

Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited

ISBN: 9781445608921

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 101

From the day she sank in April 1912 to the present, one of the enduring mysteries of the Titanic disaster was the single-funneled, four-masted 'mystery ship', sighted as the White Star liner, outward bound on her maiden voyage, began to slip beneath the calm waters of the iceberg-strewn North Atlantic.
What Really Sank the Titanic:

Author: Jennifer Hooper McCarty

Publisher: Kensington Publishing Corp.

ISBN: 9780806535975

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 973

Was the ship doomed by a faulty design? Was the hull's steel too brittle? Was the captain negligent in the face of repeated warnings? On the night of April 14, 1912, the "unsinkable" RMS Titanic, with over 2,200 passengers onboard, struck an iceberg in the North Atlantic and plunged to a watery grave. For nearly a century, the shocking loss has haunted the world. Now the same CSI techniques that are used to solve modern murder cases have been applied to the sinking of history's most famous ship. Researchers Jennifer Hooper McCarty and Tim Foecke draw on their participation in expeditions to the ship's wreckage and experiments on recovered Titanic materials to build a compelling new scenario. The answers will astound you.. . . Grippingly written, What Really Sank the Titanic is illustrated with fascinating period photographs and modern scientific evidence reflecting the authors' intensive study of Titanic artifacts for more than ten years. In an age when forensics can catch killers, this book does what no other book has before: fingers the culprit in one of the greatest tragedies ever. "A fascinating trail of historical forensics." --James R. Chiles, author of Inviting Disaster>/I> "An essential facet of Titanic history. Five stars!" --Charles Pellegrino, author of Her Name Titanic With 16 pages of photos
The Brief But Comprehensive History of the Titanic

Author: Charles River Charles River Editors

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 1985027755

Category:

Page: 108

View: 755

*Includes pictures *Includes accounts of the Titanic's construction, maiden voyage, and sinking *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents "I cannot imagine any condition which would cause a ship to founder. I cannot conceive of any vital disaster happening to this vessel." - Captain Edward J. Smith "The appearance of safety was mistaken for safety itself." - Walter Lord, author of A Night to Remember "Titanic started a voyage through history when it sailed away. One century later, there is still no port at sight." - Marina Tavares Dias Just before midnight on April 14, 1912, the RMS Titanic, the largest ship in the world, hit an iceberg, starting a chain of events that would ultimately make it history's most famous, and notorious, ship. In the over 100 years since it sank on its maiden voyage, the Titanic has been the subject of endless fascination, as evidenced by the efforts to find its final resting spot, the museums full of its objects, and the countless books, documentaries, and movies made about the doomed ocean liner. Thanks to the dramatization of the Titanic's sinking and the undying interest in the story, millions of people are familiar with various aspects of the ship's demise, and the nearly 1,500 people who died in the North Atlantic in the early morning hours of April 15, 1912. The sinking of the ship is still nearly as controversial now as it was over 100 years ago, and the drama is just as compelling. The Titanic was neither the first nor last big ship to sink, so it's clear that much of its appeal stems from the nature of ship itself. Indeed, the Titanic stands out not just for its end but for its beginning, specifically the fact that it was the most luxurious passenger ship ever built at the time. In addition to the time it took to come up with the design, the giant ship took a full three years to build, and no effort or cost was spared to outfit the Titanic in the most lavish ways. Given that the Titanic was over 100 feet tall, nearly 900 feet long, and over 90 feet wide, it's obvious that those who built her and provided all of its famous amenities had plenty of work to do. The massive ship was carrying thousands of passengers and crew members, each with their own experiences on board, and the various amenities offered among the different classes of passengers ensured that life on some decks of the ship was quite different than life on others. Almost everyone is familiar with what happened to the Titanic during its maiden voyage and the tragedy that followed, but the construction of the Titanic is often overlooked, despite being an amazing story itself, one that combined comfort and raw power with the world's foremost technological advances. Nonetheless, the seeds of the Titanic's destruction were sown even before it left for its first and last journey. Similarly, the drama involved with the sinking of the Titanic often obscures the important aftermath of the disaster, particularly the several investigations conducted on both sides of the Atlantic that sought to figure out not only why the Titanic sank but future changes that could be made in order to protect ships and passengers in the future. In fact, the course of the investigations was interesting in itself, especially since the British and Americans reached wildly different conclusions about what went wrong and led to the ship's demise. Naturally, the intense interest in the Titanic also meant that there would be great efforts made to locate the wreck. In fact, the first searches for the wreck began in the days after the giant ship went down, but given how far down it sank to the floor of the Atlantic and the fact that the ship had inaccurately transmitted its location shortly before it sank, initial efforts were doomed. As it turned out, the most famous wreck in the world would not be located until 1985, over 70 years after the ship sank that fateful April night.
The Titanic: the History and Legacy of the World's Most Famous Ship from 1907 to Today

Author: Charles River Editors

Publisher: Createspace Independent Pub

ISBN: 1502533545

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 618

*Includes dozens of pictures *Describes the construction of the Titanic, life aboard the ship during its maiden voyage, the sinking of the ship, rescue efforts, and the discovery and exploration of the wreck *Includes accounts written by passengers, crew members, White Star Line officials, and explorers of the wreck *Includes a bibliography for further reading "I cannot imagine any condition which would cause a ship to founder. I cannot conceive of any vital disaster happening to this vessel.” – Captain Edward J. Smith Just before midnight on April 14, 1912, the RMS Titanic, the largest ship in the world, hit an iceberg, starting a chain of events that would ultimately make it history's most famous, and notorious, ship. In the over 100 years since it sank on its maiden voyage, the Titanic has been the subject of endless fascination, as evidenced by the efforts to find its final resting spot, the museums full of its objects, and the countless books, documentaries, and movies made about the doomed ocean liner. Thanks to the dramatization of the Titanic's sinking and the undying interest in the story, millions of people are familiar with various aspects of the ship's demise, and the nearly 1,500 people who died in the North Atlantic in the early morning hours of April 15, 1912. The sinking of the ship is still nearly as controversial now as it was over 100 years ago, and the drama is just as compelling. The Titanic was neither the first nor last big ship to sink, so it's clear that much of its appeal stems from the nature of ship itself. Indeed, the Titanic stands out not just for its end but for its beginning, specifically the fact that it was the most luxurious passenger ship ever built at the time. In addition to the time it took to come up with the design, the giant ship took a full three years to build, and no effort or cost was spared to outfit the Titanic in the most lavish ways. Given that the Titanic was over 100 feet tall, nearly 900 feet long, and over 90 feet wide, it's obvious that those who built her and provided all of its famous amenities had plenty of work to do. The massive ship was carrying thousands of passengers and crew members, each with their own experiences on board, and the various amenities offered among the different classes of passengers ensured that life on some decks of the ship was quite different than life on others. Almost everyone is familiar with what happened to the Titanic during its maiden voyage and the tragedy that followed, but the construction of the Titanic is often overlooked, despite being an amazing story itself, one that combined comfort and raw power with the world's foremost technological advances. Nonetheless, the seeds of the Titanic's destruction were sown even before it left for its first and last journey. Similarly, the drama involved with the sinking of the Titanic often obscures the important aftermath of the disaster, particularly the several investigations conducted on both sides of the Atlantic that sought to figure out not only why the Titanic sank but future changes that could be made in order to protect ships and passengers in the future. In fact, the course of the investigations was interesting in itself, especially since the British and Americans reached wildly different conclusions about what went wrong and led to the ship's demise. The Titanic examines the entire history and legacy of the ship, from its construction to its sinking, as well as the investigations and changes that followed, the discovery of the wreck in 1985, and even the current events surrounding the ship. Along the way, life aboard the Titanic is analyzed through passengers' accounts, as are the tales of survival and death that continue to resonate. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about the Titanic like never before, in no time at all.
KS3 History 4th Edition: Technology, War and Independence 1901-Present Day eBook 3

Author: Aaron Wilkes

Publisher: Oxford University Press - Children

ISBN: 9781382033886

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page:

View: 334

The new fourth eBook edition of Technology, War and Independence is Book 3 of the best-selling Oxford KS3 History by Aaron Wilkes series. It covers twentieth century history, including the suffragettes, First and Second World Wars, democracy and dictatorship, the Cold War, the end of the British Empire, migration, changes in medicine and public health, and globalization. This e-textbook introduces the history content and skills needed to support a coherent knowledge-rich curriculum, prepares students for success in Key Stage 3 History, and builds solid foundations for GCSE study: - Carefully designed content and assessments support student progression throughout the textbook series - Historical sources and interpretations are presented with clear provenances - Over to you activities for every lesson check students' knowledge and understanding, and are ramped in difficulty to build confidence - Step-by-step guidance on key History skills provides scaffolding to introduce students to the skills needed for further study - Literacy focus feature helps improve students' essay writing skills and grammar - Complete assessment support, including quick knowledge quizzes and exam-style assessments - This book retains Aaron Wilkes' unique and engaging style, shown in recent research to inspire and motivate young historians - Technology, War and Independence Kerboodle: Lessons, Resources, Assessment offers a digital subscription packed full of customisable interactives, worksheets, animations and automarked assessments.
The Titanic

Author: Charles River Charles River Editors

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 1542468590

Category:

Page: 318

View: 797

*Includes dozens of pictures *Describes the construction of the Titanic, life aboard the ship during its maiden voyage, the sinking of the ship, rescue efforts, and the discovery and exploration of the wreck *Includes accounts written by passengers, crew members, White Star Line officials, and explorers of the wreck *Includes a bibliography for further reading "I cannot imagine any condition which would cause a ship to founder. I cannot conceive of any vital disaster happening to this vessel." - Captain Edward J. Smith Just before midnight on April 14, 1912, the RMS Titanic, the largest ship in the world, hit an iceberg, starting a chain of events that would ultimately make it history's most famous, and notorious, ship. In the over 100 years since it sank on its maiden voyage, the Titanic has been the subject of endless fascination, as evidenced by the efforts to find its final resting spot, the museums full of its objects, and the countless books, documentaries, and movies made about the doomed ocean liner. Thanks to the dramatization of the Titanic's sinking and the undying interest in the story, millions of people are familiar with various aspects of the ship's demise, and the nearly 1,500 people who died in the North Atlantic in the early morning hours of April 15, 1912. The sinking of the ship is still nearly as controversial now as it was over 100 years ago, and the drama is just as compelling. The Titanic was neither the first nor last big ship to sink, so it's clear that much of its appeal stems from the nature of ship itself. Indeed, the Titanic stands out not just for its end but for its beginning, specifically the fact that it was the most luxurious passenger ship ever built at the time. In addition to the time it took to come up with the design, the giant ship took a full three years to build, and no effort or cost was spared to outfit the Titanic in the most lavish ways. Given that the Titanic was over 100 feet tall, nearly 900 feet long, and over 90 feet wide, it's obvious that those who built her and provided all of its famous amenities had plenty of work to do. The massive ship was carrying thousands of passengers and crew members, each with their own experiences on board, and the various amenities offered among the different classes of passengers ensured that life on some decks of the ship was quite different than life on others. Almost everyone is familiar with what happened to the Titanic during its maiden voyage and the tragedy that followed, but the construction of the Titanic is often overlooked, despite being an amazing story itself, one that combined comfort and raw power with the world's foremost technological advances. Nonetheless, the seeds of the Titanic's destruction were sown even before it left for its first and last journey. Similarly, the drama involved with the sinking of the Titanic often obscures the important aftermath of the disaster, particularly the several investigations conducted on both sides of the Atlantic that sought to figure out not only why the Titanic sank but future changes that could be made in order to protect ships and passengers in the future. In fact, the course of the investigations was interesting in itself, especially since the British and Americans reached wildly different conclusions about what went wrong and led to the ship's demise. The Titanic examines the entire history and legacy of the ship, from its construction to its sinking, as well as the investigations and changes that followed, the discovery of the wreck in 1985, and even the current events surrounding the ship. Along the way, life aboard the Titanic is analyzed through passengers' accounts, as are the tales of survival and death that continue to resonate. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about the Titanic like never before, in no time at all.
The Titanic -

Author:

Publisher: X

ISBN: 9780956301536

Category:

Page: 319

View: 724

Plagued by disinformation, personal politics and poor research, the Titanic story has existed in a miasma of romance and chivalry for a century now. Going back to the official enquiry transcripts and letters and interviews from survivors, a different picture emerges, and controversies about the sinking can be addressed. Were the 3rd class held below decks while the nobility escaped? Did the captain or 1st officer shoot themselves? Why did the ship leave port with room in the boats for only half of those on board, and why were 400 seats in the boats wasted? Was the Titanic trying for a speed record? With the aid of a hundred years of research, an enlightening new account of the liner's final hours emerges.
The Loss of the S S Titanic

Author: Lawrence Beesley

Publisher: BoD – Books on Demand

ISBN: 9783941842847

Category: History

Page: 122

View: 793

The circumstances in which this book came to be written are as follows. Some five weeks after the survivors from the Titanic landed in New York, I was the guest at luncheon of Hon. Samuel J. Elder and Hon. Charles T. Gallagher, both well-known lawyers in Boston. After luncheon I was asked to relate to those present the experiences of the survivors in leaving the Titanic and reaching the Carpathia. When I had done so, Mr. Robert Lincoln O'Brien, the editor of the Boston Herald, urged me as a matter of public interest to write a correct history of the Titanic disaster, his reason being that he knew several publications were in preparation by people who had not been present at the disaster, but from newspaper accounts were piecing together a description of it. He said that these publications would probably be erroneous, full of highly coloured details, and generally calculated to disturb public thought on the matter. He was supported in his request by all present, and under this general pressure I accompanied him to Messrs. Houghton Mifflin Company, where we discussed the question of publication. Messrs. Houghton Mifflin Company took at that time exactly the same view that I did, that it was probably not advisable to put on record the Loss of the SS. Titanic, by Lawrence Beesle 4 incidents connected with the Titanic's sinking: it seemed better to forget details as rapidly as possible. However, we decided to take a few days to think about it. At our next meeting we found ourselves in agreement again, --but this time on the common ground that it would probably be a wise thing to write a history of the Titanic disaster as correctly as possible. I was supported in this decision by the fact that a short account, which I wrote at intervals on board the Carpathia, in the hope that it would calm public opinion by stating the truth of what happened as nearly as I could recollect it, appeared in all the American, English, and Colonial papers and had exactly the effect it was i
Disasters!

Author: Tom Conklin

Publisher: Scholastic Inc.

ISBN: 0590988239

Category: Education

Page: 84

View: 629

Background information, activities, and projects to teach about earthquakes, hurricanes, volcanoes, and other forces of nature.
Managing Maritime Safety

Author: Helle A. Oltedal

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351363921

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 176

View: 482

Shipping is a pillar of global trade, with 90 per cent of the world’s trade in goods and raw materials carried by ship. Despite the economic benefits this delivers, maritime operations can be dangerous, and when accidents occur the consequences are serious. Consequential outcomes from hazards at sea include serious injury, death, loss of cargo and destruction of the marine environment. Managing Maritime Safety will give you a thorough understanding of contemporary maritime safety and its management. It provides varying viewpoints on traditional safety topics in conjunction with critical discussions of the international safety management code and its application. The book also offers new perspectives on maritime safety such as ship and equipment design for safety and the relevance of safety management systems, in particular the application of the International Safety Management code to remote controlled or autonomous ships. The authors all work in the maritime industry, as practitioners, in education, research, government and classification. The combination of wide-ranging and extensive experience provides an unprecedented span of views with a strong connection to the real issues in the maritime domain. This book sets out to provide much needed consolidated knowledge for university level students on maritime safety management, incorporating theoretical, historical, research, operational and design perspectives.